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Introduction to Quarter Notes and Bank Notes: The Economics of Music Composition in the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries
[Quarter Notes and Bank Notes: The Economics of Music Composition in the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries]

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Author Info

  • F. M. Scherer

    (Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University; Woodrow Wilson School, Princeton University)

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    Abstract

    In 1700, most composers were employees of noble courts or the church. But by the nineteenth century, Chopin, Schumann, Brahms, Verdi, and many others functioned as freelance artists teaching, performing, and selling their compositions in the private marketplace. While some believe that Mozart's career marks a clean break between these two periods, this new book tells the story of a more complex and interesting transition. F. M. Scherer first examines the political, intellectual, and economic roots of the shift from patronage to a freelance market. He describes the eighteenth-century cultural "arms race" among noble courts, the spread of private concert halls and opera houses, the increasing attendance of middle-class music lovers, and the founding of conservatories. He analyzes changing trends in how composers acquired their skills and earned their living, examining such impacts as demographic developments and new modes of transportation. The book offers insight into the diversity of composers' economic aspirations, the strategies through which they pursued success, the burgeoning music publishing industry, and the emergence of copyright protection. Scherer concludes by drawing some parallels to the economic state of music composition in our own times. Written by a leading economist with an unusually broad knowledge of music, this fascinating account is directed toward individuals intrigued by the world of classical composers as well as those interested in economic history or the role of money in art.

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    Bibliographic Info

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    This chapter was published in: F. M. Scherer , , pages , 2003.

    This item is provided by Princeton University Press in its series Introductory Chapters with number 7612-1.

    Handle: RePEc:pup:chapts:7612-1

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    Web page: http://press.princeton.edu

    Related research

    Keywords: music composition; freelance artists; private marketplace; patronage; concert halls; opera houses; conservatories; copyright;

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    Cited by:
    1. Michele Boldrin & David K. Levine, 2002. "Perfectly competitive innovation," Staff Report, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis 303, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis.

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