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Playing for Real: A Text on Game Theory

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  • Binmore, Ken

    (University College, London)

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    Abstract

    Ken Binmore's previous game theory textbook, Fun and Games (D.C. Heath, 1991), carved out a significant niche in the advanced undergraduate market; it was intellectually serious and more up-to-date than its competitors, but also accessibly written. Its central thesis was that game theory allows us to understand many kinds of interactions between people, a point that Binmore amply demonstrated through a rich range of examples and applications. This replacement for the now out-of-date 1991 textbook retains the entertaining examples, but changes the organization to match how game theory courses are actually taught, making Playing for Real a more versatile text that almost all possible course designs will find easier to use, with less jumping about than before. In addition, the problem sections, already used as a reference by many teachers, have become even more clever and varied, without becoming too technical. Playing for Real will sell into advanced undergraduate courses in game theory, primarily those in economics, but also courses in the social sciences, and serve as a reference for economists. Available in OSO: http://www.oxfordscholarship.com/oso/public/content/economicsfinance/0195300572/toc.html

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    Bibliographic Info

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    This book is provided by Oxford University Press in its series OUP Catalogue with number 9780195300574 and published in 2007.

    ISBN: 9780195300574
    Order: http://ukcatalogue.oup.com/product/9780195300574.do
    Handle: RePEc:oxp:obooks:9780195300574

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    Web page: http://www.oup.com/

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    Cited by:
    1. Dassiou, X. & Glycopantis, D., 2011. "A tree formulation for signaling games," Working Papers 11/07, Department of Economics, City University London.
    2. Binmore, Ken, 2010. "Interpersonal comparison in egalitarian societies," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 26(3), pages 294-301, September.
    3. Leonardo Becchetti & Maurizio Fiaschetti & Giancarlo Marini, 2012. "Card Games and Financial Crises," CEIS Research Paper 256, Tor Vergata University, CEIS, revised 09 Oct 2012.
    4. Bradley J. Ruffle & Oscar Volij, 2012. "First-Mover Advantage In Two-Sided Competitions: An Experimental Comparison Of Role-Assignment Rules," Working Papers 1208, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Department of Economics.
    5. Silvester Van Koten & Andreas Ortmann, 2011. "Structural versus Behavioral Remedies in the Deregulation of Electricity Markets: An Experimental Investigation Guided by Theory and Policy Concerns," CERGE-EI Working Papers wp437, The Center for Economic Research and Graduate Education - Economic Institute, Prague.
    6. Anbarci, Nejat & Feltovich, Nick, 2012. "Bargaining with random implementation: An experimental study," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 76(2), pages 495-514.
    7. Nejat Anbarci & Nick Feltovich, 2013. "How sensitive are bargaining outcomes to changes in disagreement payoffs?," Experimental Economics, Springer, vol. 16(4), pages 560-596, December.
    8. Lanzi, Diego, 2013. "Frames and social games," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 227-233.
    9. Feltovich, Nick & Swierzbinski, Joe, 2011. "The role of strategic uncertainty in games: An experimental study of cheap talk and contracts in the Nash demand game," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 55(4), pages 554-574, May.
    10. Rundshagen, Bianca, 2013. "Mediation - Boon or Bane for the Stability and Efficiency of Marriage?," Annual Conference 2013 (Duesseldorf): Competition Policy and Regulation in a Global Economic Order 79840, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    11. Holler, Manfred J. & Leroch, Martin, 2010. "Efficiency and justice revisited," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 26(3), pages 311-319, September.

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