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Economic Theory and Global Warming

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  • Uzawa,Hirofumi
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    Abstract

    In this book, Professor Uzawa modifies and extends the theoretical premises of orthodox economic theory to those broad enough to be capable of analyzing the phenomena related to environmental disequilibrium, particularly global warming, and of finding institutional arrangements and policy measures that may bring about a more optimal state where natural and institutional components are harmoniously blended. He constructs a theoretical framework in which three major problems concerning global environmental issues may effectively be addressed. First, all phenomena involved with global environmental issues exhibit externalities of one kind or another. Secondly, global environmental issues involve international and intergenerational equity and justice. Thirdly, global environmental issues concern the management of the atmosphere, the oceans, water, soil, and other natural resources that have to be decided by a consensus of all affected countries.

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    Bibliographic Info

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    This book is provided by Cambridge University Press in its series Cambridge Books with number 9780521823869 and published in 2003.

    Order: http://www.cambridge.org/uk/catalogue/catalogue.asp?isbn=9780521823869
    Handle: RePEc:cup:cbooks:9780521823869

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    Web page: http://www.cambridge.org

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    Cited by:
    1. Mikhail Golosov & John Hassler & Per Krusell & Aleh Tsyvinski, 2014. "Optimal Taxes on Fossil Fuel in General Equilibrium," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 82(1), pages 41-88, 01.
    2. Tol, Richard S.J., 2013. "Targets for global climate policy: An overview," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 37(5), pages 911-928.
    3. Andrei Bazhanov, 2012. "A Closed-Form Solution to Stollery’s Problem with Damage in Utility," Computational Economics, Society for Computational Economics, vol. 39(4), pages 365-386, April.
    4. Wolfgang Buchholz & Richard Cornes & Wolfgang Peters, 2008. "Existence, uniqueness and some comparative statics for ratio and Lindahl equilibria," Journal of Economics, Springer, vol. 95(2), pages 167-177, November.
    5. M. Gallastegui & M. González-Eguino & I. Galarraga, 2012. "Cost effectiveness of a combination of instruments for global warming: a quantitative approach for Spain," SERIEs, Spanish Economic Association, vol. 3(1), pages 111-132, March.
    6. Folkmanis, Andrew Janis, 2011. "International and European market mechanisms in the climate change agenda--An assessment of their potential to trigger investments in the Mediterranean solar plan," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(8), pages 4490-4496, August.
    7. Wolfgang Buchholz & Wolfgang Peters, 2007. "Justifying the Lindahl solution as an outcome of fair cooperation," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 133(1), pages 157-169, October.
    8. Hirofumi Uzawa, 2008. "Global Warming, Imputed Prices, and Sustainable Development," DEGIT Conference Papers c013_014, DEGIT, Dynamics, Economic Growth, and International Trade.
    9. Yamaguchi, Rintaro & Sato, Masayuki & Ueta, Kazuhiro, 2009. "Genuine savings with adjustment costs," MPRA Paper 16347, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    10. Yiyong Cai & Warwick J. McKibbin, 2013. "Uncertainty and International Climate Change Negotiations," CAMA Working Papers 2013-13, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.

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