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Unintended consequences: Regulating the quality of subsidized day care

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  • Susan Rose-Ackerman

    (Professor of Law and Political Economy, Columbia University)

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    Abstract

    Advocates for the poor frequently support uniform, high federal standards for subsidized social services. While such standards may improve the quality of services for those who qualify, they can also have unintended but important side effects. Stringent regulations may actually curtail the supply of services, promote segregation, and expand the role of large subsidized for-profit firms. All these possibilities are illustrated by the history of federal regulation in subsidizing child day care. The federal government's retreat from regulation in 1980 and 1981 may have had results that-even if unintended-were in many ways salutary.

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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.2307/3324002
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. in its journal Journal of Policy Analysis and Management.

    Volume (Year): 3 (1983)
    Issue (Month): 1 ()
    Pages: 14-30

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    Handle: RePEc:wly:jpamgt:v:3:y:1983:i:1:p:14-30

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    Web page: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/34787/home

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    Cited by:
    1. Robert Fenge & Wolfgang Ochel, 2001. "Die Vereinbarkeit von Familie und Beruf: der Schlüssel für eine kinderreiche Gesellschaft," Ifo Schnelldienst, Ifo Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 54(12), pages 17-29, November.
    2. David Blau & Janet Currie, 2004. "Preschool, Day Care, and Afterschool Care: Who's Minding the Kids?," NBER Working Papers 10670, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. David M. Blau, 2003. "Do child care regulations affect the child care and labor markets?," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 22(3), pages 443-465.
    4. Randal Heeb & M. Rebecca Kilburn, 2004. "The Effects of State Regulations on Childcare Prices and Choices," Working Papers 137, RAND Corporation Publications Department.
    5. Blau, David M., 2007. "Unintended consequences of child care regulations," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(3), pages 513-538, June.

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