Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article or follow this journal

Does state AFDC generosity affect child SSI participation?

Contents:

Author Info

  • Bowen Garrett

    (Health Policy Center of the Urban Institute.)

  • Sherry Glied

    (Division of Health Policy and Management, Joseph L. Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University.)

Registered author(s):

    Abstract

    This article examines the extent of interactions or spillovers between the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) programs for children. In the early 1990s, the Social Security Administration substantially relaxed child eligibility criteria for SSI benefits. Since the changes, the number of U.S. children receiving cash and medical benefits through SSI tripled to nearly 1 million. The article describes a family's decision to participate in SSI and|or AFDC, and uses state-level data for three years before, and three years after, the Zebley decision to estimate the effect of state program generosity on child program participation. The expansions in child SSI eligibility increased child SSI participation and contributed to increased total program participation by children in the early 1990s. Child SSI participation increased more in states with lower AFDC payments and higher state SSI supplementation payments. These results suggest that families use SSI and AFDC as substitutes. At least 32 percent of the Zebley increase in SSI is likely attributable to the SSI-AFDC benefit gap for the median AFDC benefit state. © 2000 by the Association for Public Policy and Management.

    Download Info

    To our knowledge, this item is not available for download. To find whether it is available, there are three options:
    1. Check below under "Related research" whether another version of this item is available online.
    2. Check on the provider's web page whether it is in fact available.
    3. Perform a search for a similarly titled item that would be available.

    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. in its journal Journal of Policy Analysis and Management.

    Volume (Year): 19 (2000)
    Issue (Month): 2 ()
    Pages: 275-295

    as in new window
    Handle: RePEc:wly:jpamgt:v:19:y:2000:i:2:p:275-295

    Contact details of provider:
    Web page: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/34787/home

    Related research

    Keywords:

    References

    References listed on IDEAS
    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
    as in new window
    1. Cutler, David M & Gruber, Jonathan, 1996. "Does Public Insurance Crowd Out Private Insurance?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, MIT Press, vol. 111(2), pages 391-430, May.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as in new window

    Cited by:
    1. Mark Duggan & Perry Singleton & Jae Song, 2005. "Aching to Retire? The Rise in the Full Retirement Age and its Impact on the Disability Rolls," NBER Working Papers 11811, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Elizabeth Powers & David Neumark, 2001. "The Supplemental Security Income Program and Incentives to Take Up Social Security Early Retirement: Empirical Evidence from Matched SIPP and Social.," NBER Working Papers 8670, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Marcia K. Meyers & Janet C. Gornick & Laura R. Peck, 2001. "Packaging Support for Low-Income Families: Policy Variation across the United States," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 20(3), pages 457-483.
    4. Elizabeth T. Powers & David Neumark, 2003. "The Supplemental Security Income Program and Incentives to Claim Social Security Retirement Early: Empirical Evidence from Matched SIPP and Social Security Administrative Files," Working Papers, University of Michigan, Michigan Retirement Research Center wp036, University of Michigan, Michigan Retirement Research Center.
    5. Mark Duggan & Melissa Schettini Kearney, 2005. "The Impact of Child SSI Enrollment on Household Outcomes: Evidence from the Survey of Income and Program Participation," NBER Working Papers 11568, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Reiso, Katrine Holm, 2014. "The Effect of Welfare Reforms on Benefit Substitution," Discussion Paper Series in Economics, Department of Economics, Norwegian School of Economics 22/2014, Department of Economics, Norwegian School of Economics.
    7. Lynn A. Karoly & Paul S. Davies, 2004. "The Impact of the 1996 SSI Childhood Disability Reforms: Evidence from Matched SIPP-SSA Data," Working Papers, University of Michigan, Michigan Retirement Research Center wp079, University of Michigan, Michigan Retirement Research Center.
    8. Mark G. Duggan & Melissa Schettini Kearney, 2007. "The impact of child SSI enrollment on household outcomes," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 26(4), pages 861-886.
    9. Lex Borghans & Anne C. Gielen & Erzo F.P. Luttmer, 2012. "Social Support Substitution and the Earnings Rebound: Evidence from a Regression Discontinuity in Disability Insurance Reform," NBER Working Papers 18261, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. Duggan, Mark & Singleton, Perry & Song, Jae, 2007. "Aching to retire? The rise in the full retirement age and its impact on the social security disability rolls," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 91(7-8), pages 1327-1350, August.
    11. Lucie Schmidt, 2013. "The New Safety Net? Supplemental Security Income after Welfare Reform," Department of Economics Working Papers, Department of Economics, Williams College 2013-07, Department of Economics, Williams College.
    12. Stefan Staubli, 2009. "Tightening the purse strings: the effect of stricter DI eligibility criteria on labor supply," IEW - Working Papers, Institute for Empirical Research in Economics - University of Zurich 458, Institute for Empirical Research in Economics - University of Zurich.
    13. Slack, Kristen Shook & Magnuson, Katherine A. & Berger, Lawrence M. & Yoo, Joan & Coley, Rebekah Levine & Dunifon, Rachel & Dworsky, Amy & Kalil, Ariel & Knab, Jean & Lohman, Brenda J. & Osborne, Cynt, 2007. "Family economic well-being following the 1996 welfare reform: Trend data from five non-experimental panel studies," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 29(6), pages 698-720, June.
    14. Purtell, Kelly M. & Gershoff, Elizabeth T. & Aber, J. Lawrence, 2012. "Low income families' utilization of the Federal “Safety Net”: Individual and state-level predictors of TANF and Food Stamp receipt," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 34(4), pages 713-724.
    15. Nancy E. Reichman & Hope Corman & Kelly Noonan, 2004. "Effects of Child Health on Sources of Public Support," NBER Working Papers 10762, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    16. Hungerman, Daniel M., 2009. "Crowd-out and diversity," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 93(5-6), pages 729-740, June.
    17. Dahlia K. Remler & Jason E. Rachlin & Sherry A. Glied, 2001. "What can the take-up of other programs teach us about how to improve take-up of health insurance programs?," NBER Working Papers 8185, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    Lists

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:wly:jpamgt:v:19:y:2000:i:2:p:275-295. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley-Blackwell Digital Licensing) or (Christopher F. Baum).

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.