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Self-Selection and the Redistributive Impact of In-Kind Transfers: An Econometric Analysis

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  • Hanan G. Jacoby

Abstract

Self-targeting welfare programs have received increasing attention from economists and policymakers alike. This paper provides evidence on the redistributive impact of transferring low-quality goods in-kind. I study a school feeding program in Jamaica, which distributes a bland snack to all students. Poorer households and those with a greater number of eligible children are found significantly more likely to self-select into the program. But, against these targeting benefits is a large estimated dead-weight loss.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by University of Wisconsin Press in its journal Journal of Human Resources.

Volume (Year): 32 (1997)
Issue (Month): 2 ()
Pages: 223-249

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Handle: RePEc:uwp:jhriss:v:32:y:1997:i:2:p:223-249

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Web page: http://jhr.uwpress.org/

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Cited by:
  1. Conning, Jonathan & Kevane, Michael, 2002. "Community-Based Targeting Mechanisms for Social Safety Nets: A Critical Review," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 30(3), pages 375-394, March.
  2. Daniela Sonedda & Gilberto Turati, 2005. "Winners and Losers in the Italian Welfare State: A Microsimulation Analysis of Income Redistribution Considering In-Kind Transfers," Giornale degli Economisti, GDE (Giornale degli Economisti e Annali di Economia), Bocconi University, vol. 64(4), pages 423-464, December.
  3. Rocio Sánchez-Mangas & Virginia Sánchez-Marcos, . "Reconciling female labor participation and motherhood: the effect of benefits for working mothers," Studies on the Spanish Economy 195, FEDEA.
  4. Tim Callan & Claire Keane, 2008. "Non-Cash Benefits and the Distribution of Economic Welfare," Papers WP245, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
  5. Hidrobo, Melissa & Hoddinott, John F. & Peterman, Amber & Margolies, Amy & Moreira, Vanessa, 2012. "Cash, food, or vouchers?: Evidence from a randomized experiment in northern Ecuador," IFPRI discussion papers 1234, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  6. Vermeersch, Christel & Kremer, Michael, 2005. "Schools meals, educational achievement and school competition: evidence from a randomized evaluation," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3523, The World Bank.
  7. Massimo Baldini & Gilberto Turati, 2012. "Perceived quality of public services, liquidity constraints, and the demand of private specialist care," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 42(2), pages 487-511, April.
  8. González-Flores, Mario & Heracleous, Maria & Winters, Paul, 2012. "Leaving the Safety Net: An Analysis of Dropouts in an Urban Conditional Cash Transfer Program," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 40(12), pages 2505-2521.

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