Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article or follow this journal

Optimum City Size: The External Diseconomy Question

Contents:

Author Info

  • Henderson, J V

Abstract

This paper discusses whether market-achieved city size is greater or less than optimum city size. The divergence between optimum and achieved city size is due to external diseconomies such as pollution. Imposing an optimal tax on pollution may not, as is commonly thought, cause even an initial reduction in output of the polluting good. Moreover, the paper shows, even if output initially falls with optimal taxation, the corresponding reduction in pollution and shift toward consumption of non-polluting goods will make city inhabitants better off. The increased welfare of city inhabitants will result in immigration to the city.

(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://links.jstor.org/sici?sici=0022-3808%28197403%2F197404%2982%3A2%3C373%3AOCSTED%3E2.0.CO%3B2-Z&origin=repec
File Function: full text
Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to JSTOR subscribers. See http://www.jstor.org for details.

As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

Bibliographic Info

Article provided by University of Chicago Press in its journal Journal of Political Economy.

Volume (Year): 82 (1974)
Issue (Month): 2 (Part I, March-April)
Pages: 373-88

as in new window
Handle: RePEc:ucp:jpolec:v:82:y:1974:i:2:p:373-88

Contact details of provider:
Web page: http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/JPE/

Related research

Keywords:

Other versions of this item:

References

No references listed on IDEAS
You can help add them by filling out this form.

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Lee, Sanghoon, 2010. "Ability sorting and consumer city," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(1), pages 20-33, July.
  2. Ayer, Harry W. & Weidman, Joe, 1976. "The Rural Town As A Producing Unit: An Empirical Analysis And Implications For Rural Development Policy," Southern Journal of Agricultural Economics, Southern Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 8(02), December.
  3. Fumitoshi Mizutani & Tomoyasu Tanaka & Noriyoshi Nakayama, 2012. "Estimation of Optimal Metropolitan Size in Japan with Consideration of Social Costs," Discussion Papers 2012-19, Kobe University, Graduate School of Business Administration.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ucp:jpolec:v:82:y:1974:i:2:p:373-88. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Journals Division).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.