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Do Right-to-Carry Laws Deter Violent Crime?

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Author Info

  • Black, Dan A
  • Nagin, Daniel S

Abstract

John R. Lott and David B. Mustard conclude that right-to-carry laws deter violent crime. Our reanalysis of Lott and Mustard's data provides no basis for drawing confident conclusions about the impact of right-to-carry laws on violent crime. We document that their results are highly sensitive to small changes in their model and sample. Without Florida in the sample, there is no detectable impact of right-to-carry laws on the rate of murder and rape, the two crimes that by the calculations of Lou and Mustard account for 80 percent of the social benefit of right-to-carry laws. A more general model based on year-to-year differences yields no evidence of significant impact for any type of violent crime. As a result, inference based on the Lou and Mustard model is inappropriate, and their results cannot be used responsibly to formulate public policy. Copyright 1998 by the University of Chicago.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by University of Chicago Press in its journal Journal of Legal Studies.

Volume (Year): 27 (1998)
Issue (Month): 1 (January)
Pages: 209-19

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Handle: RePEc:ucp:jlstud:v:27:y:1998:i:1:p:209-19

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Web page: http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/JLS/

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Citations

Blog mentions

As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. Weird attacks on my gun research, also Scienceblogs censoring responses
    by John Lott in John Lott on 2010-03-30 22:20:00
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Cited by:
  1. Braakmann, Nils, 2012. "How do individuals deal with victimization and victimization risk? Longitudinal evidence from Mexico," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 84(1), pages 335-344.
  2. Correa, Hector, 2001. "An analytic approach to the study of gun control policies," Socio-Economic Planning Sciences, Elsevier, vol. 35(4), pages 253-262, December.
  3. Daniel Cerqueira & João Manoel Pinho de Mello, 2013. "Evaluating a National Anti-Firearm Law and Estimating the Causal Effect of Guns on Crime," Textos para discussão 607, Department of Economics PUC-Rio (Brazil).
  4. Ian Ayres & Steven D. Levitt, 1997. "Measuring Positive Externalities from Unobservable Victim Precaution: An Empirical Analysis of Lojack," NBER Working Papers 5928, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Brian G. Knight, 2011. "State Gun Policy and Cross-State Externalities: Evidence from Crime Gun Tracing," NBER Working Papers 17469, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Hugo Mialon & Tom Wiseman, 2004. "The Impact of Gun Laws: A Model of Crime and Self-defense," Emory Economics 0412, Department of Economics, Emory University (Atlanta).
  7. Jens Otto Ludwig, 1998. "Concealed-Gun-Carrying Laws and Violent Crime: Evidence from State Panel Data," JCPR Working Papers 31, Northwestern University/University of Chicago Joint Center for Poverty Research.
  8. Bartley, William Alan, 1999. "Will rationing guns reduce crime?," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 62(2), pages 241-243, February.
  9. M. Martin Boyer, 2001. "Resistance is Futile: An Essay in Crime and Commitment," CIRANO Working Papers 2001s-58, CIRANO.
  10. Mark Duggan, 2000. "More Guns, More Crime," NBER Working Papers 7967, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  11. Carlisle E. Moody & Thomas B. Marvell, 2008. "The Debate on Right-to-Carry Concealed Weapons Laws," Working Papers 71, Department of Economics, College of William and Mary.
  12. Rubin, Paul H. & Dezhbakhsh, Hashem, 2003. "The effect of concealed handgun laws on crime: beyond the dummy variables," International Review of Law and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(2), pages 199-216, June.
  13. Mark Duggan & Randi Hjalmarsson & Brian A. Jacob, 2008. "The Effect of Gun Shows on Gun-Related Deaths: Evidence from California and Texas," NBER Working Papers 14371, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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