Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article or follow this journal

Market Price and Income Elasticities of New Vehicles Demand

Contents:

Author Info

  • McCarthy, Patrick S

Abstract

Recent evidence from aggregate models of automobile demand indicates that, when not corrected for quality differences, market price elasticity of demand is substantially biased downwards. This note presents new information on market price and income elasticities derived from a disaggregate demand model that controls for cost, household income, vehicle attributes and perceived quality, consumer search, and manufacturer. Based on an extensive household survey of new vehicle purchasers in 1989, market price and income elasticities are estimated to be -0.87 and 1.70, respectively. Moreover, excluding vehicle quality from a well-specified model is found to have little effect upon the estimated market elasticities. Copyright 1996 by MIT Press.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://links.jstor.org/sici?sici=0034-6535%28199608%2978%3A3%3C543%3AMPAIEO%3E2.0.CO%3B2-6&origin=bc
File Function: full text
Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to JSTOR subscribers. See http://www.jstor.org for details.

As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

Bibliographic Info

Article provided by MIT Press in its journal Review of Economics & Statistics.

Volume (Year): 78 (1996)
Issue (Month): 3 (August)
Pages: 543-47

as in new window
Handle: RePEc:tpr:restat:v:78:y:1996:i:3:p:543-47

Contact details of provider:
Web page: http://mitpress.mit.edu/journals/

Order Information:
Web: http://mitpress.mit.edu/journal-home.tcl?issn=00346535

Related research

Keywords:

References

No references listed on IDEAS
You can help add them by filling out this form.

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Martin Achtnicht, 2012. "German car buyers’ willingness to pay to reduce CO 2 emissions," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 113(3), pages 679-697, August.
  2. Korenok, Oleg & Hoffer, George E. & Millner, Edward L., 2010. "Non-price determinants of automotive demand: Restyling matters most," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 63(12), pages 1282-1289, December.
  3. Achtnicht, Martin & Bühler, Georg & Hermeling, Claudia, 2008. "Impact of Service Station Networks on Purchase Decisions of Alternative-fuel Vehicles," ZEW Discussion Papers 08-088, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
  4. David Lagakos, 2009. "Superstores or mom and pops? Technolgy adoption and productivity differences in retail trade," Staff Report 428, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis.
  5. repec:dgr:uvatin:2007060 is not listed on IDEAS
  6. Parry, Ian & Fischer, Carolyn & Harrington, Winston, 2004. "Should Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) Standards Be Tightened?," Discussion Papers dp-04-53, Resources For the Future.
  7. David L. Greene & K.G. Duleep & Walter McManus, 2004. "Future Potential of Hybrid and Diesel Powertrains in the U.S. Light-Duty Vehicle Market," Industrial Organization 0410003, EconWPA.
  8. Martin, Elliott William, 2009. "New Vehicle Choice, Fuel Economy and Vehicle Incentives: An Analysis of Hybrid Tax Credits and the Gasoline Tax," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt5gd206wv, University of California Transportation Center.
  9. Martin, Elliot William, 2009. "New Vehicle Choices, Fuel Economy and Vehicle Incentives: An Analysis of Hybrid Tax Credits and Gasoline Tax," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt6sz198c2, University of California Transportation Center.
  10. Meredith Fowlie & Christopher R. Knittel & Catherine Wolfram, 2012. "Sacred Cars? Cost-Effective Regulation of Stationary and Nonstationary Pollution Sources," American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, American Economic Association, vol. 4(1), pages 98-126, February.
  11. Nejat Anbarci & Monica Escaleras & Charles Register, 2005. "Income, Income Inequality and the “Hidden Epidemic” of Traffic Fatalities," Working Papers 05002, Department of Economics, College of Business, Florida Atlantic University, revised Aug 2006.
  12. Achtnicht, Martin, 2009. "German car buyers' willingness to pay to reduce CO2 emissions," ZEW Discussion Papers 09-058, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
  13. John Eakins, 2013. "The Determinants of Household Car Ownership: Empirical Evidence from the Irish Household Budget Survey," Surrey Energy Economics Centre (SEEC), School of Economics Discussion Papers (SEEDS) 144, Surrey Energy Economics Centre (SEEC), School of Economics, University of Surrey.
  14. Jan Bruha & Tibor Hledik & Tomas Holub & Jiri Polansky & Jaromir Tonner, 2013. "Incorporating Judgments and Dealing with Data Uncertainty in Forecasting at the Czech National Bank," Research and Policy Notes 2013/02, Czech National Bank, Research Department.
  15. Javier Asensio & Anna Matas & José Luis Raymond, 2001. "Petrol consumption and redistributive effects of its taxation in Spain," Working Papers wp0109, Department of Applied Economics at Universitat Autonoma of Barcelona.
  16. Chen, Anning, 2011. "Reliable GPS Integer Ambiguity Resolution," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt9gs0t2f9, University of California Transportation Center.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:tpr:restat:v:78:y:1996:i:3:p:543-47. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Karie Kirkpatrick).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.