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PlusCa Change? evidence on global trends in gender norms and stereotypes

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Author Info

  • Stephanie Seguino

Abstract

Gender norms and stereotypes that perpetuate inequality are deeply embedded in social and individual consciousness and, as a result, are resistant to change. Gender stratification theories propose that women's control over material resources can increase bargaining power to leverage change in key institutions, prompting a shift to more equitable norms. By extension, policies that promote women's paid employment should serve as a fulcrum for gender equitable change. Is there any evidence to support this hypothesis? Investigating this requires a means to capture gender norms and stereotypes. The World Values Survey provides just such a mechanism because it contains a series of gender questions that span a twenty-year period and includes respondents from more than seventy countries. This paper uses that survey's data to analyze determinants of trends in norms and stereotypes over time and across countries, and finds evidence that increases in women's paid employment promotes gender equitable norms and stereotypes.

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File URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13545700601184880
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Feminist Economics.

Volume (Year): 13 (2007)
Issue (Month): 2 ()
Pages: 1-28

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Handle: RePEc:taf:femeco:v:13:y:2007:i:2:p:1-28

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Web page: http://www.tandfonline.com/RFEC20

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Related research

Keywords: Economic growth; employment; gender ideology; gender norms and stereotypes; gender roles; globalization; JEL Codes: A14; J16; J21;

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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Kelkar, Govind, 2013. "At the threshold of economic empowerment : women, work and gender regimes in Asia," ILO Working Papers 483478, International Labour Organization.
  2. Trzcinski, Eileen & Holst, Elke, 2010. "Gender Differences in Subjective Well-Being in and out of Management Positions," IZA Discussion Papers 5116, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  3. Eileen Trzcinski & Elke Holst, 2011. "A Critique and Reframing of Personality in Labour Market Theory: Locus of Control and Labour Market Outcomes," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1157, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
  4. Seguino, Stephanie, 2011. "Help or Hindrance? Religion's Impact on Gender Inequality in Attitudes and Outcomes," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 39(8), pages 1308-1321, August.
  5. Bettina Casad & Amy Marcus-Newhall & Brandon Nakawaki & Alian Kasabian & Judith LeMaster, 2012. "Younger Age at First Childbirth Predicts Mothers’ Lower Economic and Psychological Well-Being Later in Life," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 33(4), pages 421-435, December.
  6. Pastore, Francesco & Tenaglia, Simona, 2013. "Ora et non Labora? A Test of the Impact of Religion on Female Labor Supply," IZA Discussion Papers 7356, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  7. Fink, Janet S. & Parker, Heidi M. & Cunningham, George B. & Cuneen, Jacquelyn, 2012. "Female athlete endorsers: Determinants of effectiveness," Sport Management Review, Elsevier, vol. 15(1), pages 13-22.
  8. Madalozzo, Regina & Martins, Sergio R. & Shiratori, Ludmila, 2008. "Participação no Mercado de Trabalho e no Trabalho Doméstico: Homens e Mulheres têm Condições Iguais?," Insper Working Papers wpe_118, Insper Working Paper, Insper Instituto de Ensino e Pesquisa.
  9. Dante Contreras & Agustin Hurtado & M. Francisca Sara, 2012. "La Excepción Chilena y las Percepciones de Género en la Participación Laboral Femenina," Working Papers wp374, University of Chile, Department of Economics.
  10. Eileen Trzcinski & Elke Holst, 2011. "Why Men Might "Have It All" While Women Still Have to Choose between Career and Family in Germany," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 356, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
  11. Marina Della Giusta & Nigar Hashimzade & Sarah Jewell, 2011. "Why Care? Social Norms, Relative Income and the Supply of Unpaid Care," Economics & Management Discussion Papers em-dp2011-03, Henley Business School, Reading University.

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