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The KwaZulu-Natal Income Dynamics Study (KIDS) third wave: methods, first findings and an agenda for future research

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  • Julian May
  • Jorge Aguero
  • Michael Carter
  • Ian Tim�us

Abstract

The panel study known as the KwaZulu-Natal Income Dynamics Study (KIDS) has been extended by a new wave of data collection conducted in 2004. This third wave of the study interviewed 865 households containing core adult members from 760 of the households contacted in 1993. It also conducted interviews in next-generation households that have split off from the parental households and in the current households of children who have been fostered out. The study finds that the proportion of people aged 20-44 dying between the second and third waves was nearly three times the proportion dying between the first two waves. The pattern of income distribution is one of increasing poverty and inequality since 1993, although the partial reversal of these trends in the post-1998 period is hopeful, as are signs of relative prosperity among those who established independent next-generation households. In addition, access to services has improved.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Development Southern Africa.

Volume (Year): 24 (2007)
Issue (Month): 5 ()
Pages: 629-648

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Handle: RePEc:taf:deveza:v:24:y:2007:i:5:p:629-648

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Cited by:
  1. Anderson, Bret, 2012. "Converting Asset Holdings into Livelihood: An Empirical Study on the Role of Household Agency in South Africa," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 40(7), pages 1394-1406.
  2. Shinsuke Tanaka & Takahiro Ito, 2014. "Abolishing User Fees, Fertility Choice, and Educational Attainment," IDEC DP2 Series 4-1, Hiroshima University, Graduate School for International Development and Cooperation (IDEC).
  3. Francis Teal & Andrew Kerr, 2012. "The Determinants of Earnings Inequalities: Panel data evidence from South Africa," Economics Series Working Papers WPS/2012-04, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
  4. Yamauchi, Futoshi & Buthelezi, Thabani & Velia, Myriam, 2006. "Gender, labor, and prime-age adult mortality: evidence from South Africa," FCND discussion papers 208, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  5. Shinsuke Tanaka, 2008. "Access to Health Infrastructure and Child Health Development: Evidence from Post-Apartheid South Africa," ISER Discussion Paper 0768, Institute of Social and Economic Research, Osaka University, revised Jan 2010.

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