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Using discrete choice experiments to value health and health care

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  • Ramón Álvarez-Esteban

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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s12208-008-0014-5
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Springer in its journal International Review on Public and Nonprofit Marketing.

    Volume (Year): 5 (2008)
    Issue (Month): 2 (December)
    Pages: 201-203

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    Handle: RePEc:spr:irpnmk:v:5:y:2008:i:2:p:201-203

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    Web page: http://www.springer.com/business/journal/12208

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    Cited by:
    1. Vishva Danthurebandara & Jie Yu & Martina Vandebroek, 2011. "Sequential choice designs to estimate the heterogeneity distribution of willingness-to-pay," Quantitative Marketing and Economics, Springer, vol. 9(4), pages 429-448, December.
    2. Sung-Hee Jeon & Jeremiah Hurley, 2010. "Physician Resource Planning in Canada: The Need for a Stronger Behavioural Foundation," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 36(3), pages 359-375, September.
    3. Ofra Golan & Paul Hansen & Giora Kaplan & Orna Tal, 2010. "Health Technology Prioritisation: Which criteria for prioritising new technologies, and what are their relative weights?," Working Papers 1006, University of Otago, Department of Economics, revised Jul 2010.
    4. Alison Barber & Paul Hansen & Ray Naden & Franz Ombler & Ralph Stewart, 2011. "Who's next? A new process for creating points systems for prioritising patients for elective health services," Working Papers 1104, University of Otago, Department of Economics, revised Jul 2011.
    5. Colin Green & Karen Gerard, 2009. "Exploring the social value of health-care interventions: a stated preference discrete choice experiment," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 18(8), pages 951-976.

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