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The Intertemporal Relationship between State and Local Government Revenues and Expenditures: Evidence from OECD Countries

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  • Joulfaian, David
  • Mookerjee, Rajen

Abstract

This paper addresses the intertemporal relationship between state and local government revenues and expenditures in sixteen OECD countries. The results support both the spend-and-tax hypothesis and the tax-and-spend hypothesis. The results also highlight the importance of controlling for the effects of grants in bivariate causality tests between revenues and expenditures at the sub- national level. The paper also provides a comparison of the intertemporal relationship between government revenues and expenditures at the central and subnational levels.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by in its journal Public Finance = Finances publiques.

Volume (Year): 45 (1990)
Issue (Month): 1 ()
Pages: 109-17

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Handle: RePEc:pfi:pubfin:v:45:y:1990:i:1:p:109-17

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Cited by:
  1. Mohsen Mehrara & Abbas Ali Rezaei, 2014. "The Long Run Relationship between Government Revenue and Expenditure in Iran: A Co integration Analysis in the Presence of Structural Breaks," International Journal of Academic Research in Business and Social Sciences, Human Resource Management Academic Research Society, International Journal of Academic Research in Business and Social Sciences, vol. 4(5), pages 288-301, May.
  2. Jean-Claude Nachega & Ousmane Dore, 2000. "Budgetary Convergence in the WEAMU," IMF Working Papers 00/109, International Monetary Fund.
  3. M. Haider Hussain, 2004. "On the Causal Relationship between Government Expenditure and Tax Revenue in Pakistan," Lahore Journal of Economics, Department of Economics, The Lahore School of Economics, vol. 9(2), pages 105-117, Jul-Dec.
  4. Benjamin S. Cheng & Ashagre Yigletu, 2000. "Causality Between Taxes and Expenditures in the U.S.: A Multivariate Approach," New York Economic Review, New York State Economics Association (NYSEA), vol. 31(1), pages 15-26.
  5. Mehmet Serkan Tosun & Sohrab Abizadeh, 2005. "Economic growth and tax components: an analysis of tax changes in OECD," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(19), pages 2251-2263.
  6. Westerlund, Joakim & Mahdavi, Saeid & Firoozi, Fathali, 2011. "The tax-spending nexus: Evidence from a panel of US state-local governments," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 28(3), pages 885-890, May.
  7. M. Haider Hussain, 2005. "On the Causal Relationship between Government Expenditure and Tax Revenue in Pakistan," Macroeconomics 0509014, EconWPA.

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