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The Snakes and Ladders of Twenty-First-Century Trade Unionism

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  • Crouch, Colin
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    Abstract

    Trade unions in the advanced countries face a difficult future. Their core membership bases in manufacturing industry and public services have become declining sectors of employment. Keynesian demand management, on which they depended for tight labour markets, has collapsed. Most industrial relations activity has shifted to the enterprise level, which they often find difficult to penetrate. Precarious employment, which makes union membership difficult, is growing. On the other hand, certain advantages offset these weaknesses. For a number of different recent economic and political elites often need the support of trade unions for national social pacts. Also, employment conditions continue to create new social problems for working people, which only unions can express. Unions in different countries encounter these combinations of favourable and unfavourable prospects in very different ways, which is likely to produce increasing diversity among the emerging national patterns. Copyright 2000 by Oxford University Press.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Oxford University Press in its journal Oxford Review of Economic Policy.

    Volume (Year): 16 (2000)
    Issue (Month): 1 (Spring)
    Pages: 70-83

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    Handle: RePEc:oup:oxford:v:16:y:2000:i:1:p:70-83

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    Web page: http://oxrep.oupjournals.org/

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    Cited by:
    1. Stephen Drinkwater & Peter Ingram, 2003. "Have industrial relations in the UK really improved?," School of Economics Discussion Papers 0903, School of Economics, University of Surrey.
    2. Lars Calmfors, 2001. "Wages and Wage-Bargaining Institutions in the Emu : A Survey of the Issues," CESifo Working Paper Series 520, CESifo Group Munich.
    3. Calmfors, Lars, 2001. "Wages and wage-bargaining institutions in the EMU – a survey of the issues," Seminar Papers 690, Stockholm University, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    4. Sebastian Dellepiane & Niamh Hardiman, 2012. "Fiscal Politics In Time: Pathways to Fiscal Consolidation, 1980-2012," Working Papers 201228, Geary Institute, University College Dublin.

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