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Time-Series Evidence on the Nonlinearity Hypothesis for Public Spending

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  • Stefan Mittnik
  • Thorsten Neumann

Abstract

Barro-type endogenous growth models propose a nonmonotonic relationship between productive public spending and growth. Under this so-called nonlinearity hypothesis the size and direction of growth effects due to an increase in public spending depend on the share of public spending in GDP. Employing German time-series data we examine the validity of the nonlinearity hypothesis. We estimate growth effects by using models whose coefficients are allowed to vary with the share of public spending in GDP. Our results support the hypothesis for public consumption but not for public investment data. (JEL H54, E62, C22) Copyright 2003, Oxford University Press.

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1093/ei/cbg028
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Western Economic Association International in its journal Economic Inquiry.

Volume (Year): 41 (2003)
Issue (Month): 4 (October)
Pages: 565-573

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Handle: RePEc:oup:ecinqu:v:41:y:2003:i:4:p:565-573

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Cited by:
  1. Thibaut Dort & Pierre-Guillaume Méon & Khalid Sekkat, 2013. "Does investment spur growth everywhere? Not where institutions are weak," Working Papers CEB 13-030, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
  2. François Facchini & Mickaël Melki, 2011. "Optimal Government Size and Economic Growth in France (1871-2008): An explanation by the State and Market Failures," Documents de travail du Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne 11077, Université Panthéon-Sorbonne (Paris 1), Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne.
  3. Rajkumar, Andrew Sunil & Swaroop, Vinaya, 2008. "Public spending and outcomes: Does governance matter?," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 86(1), pages 96-111, April.
  4. François Facchini & Mickaël Melki, 2013. "Political Ideology and Economic Growth: Evidence from the French Democracy," Documents de travail du Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne 13077, Université Panthéon-Sorbonne (Paris 1), Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne.
  5. Giorgio d'Agostino & Luca Pieroni & J Paul Dunne, 2009. "Optimal Military Spending in the US: A Time Series Analysis," Working Papers 0903, Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol.
  6. Milad Zarin-Nejadan, 2011. "Government and Growth," IRENE Working Papers 11-02, IRENE Institute of Economic Research.

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