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Wage Protection Systems, Segregation and Gender Pay Inequalities: West Germany, the Netherlands and Great Britain

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  • Black, B
  • Trainor, M
  • Spencer, J E
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    Abstract

    This paper provides an empirical test of Rubery and Fagan's (1995) hypothesis that gender inequalities are influenced primarily by the comprehensiveness of the overall wage protection system in a country and by the extent of gender segregation. Gender discrimination in earnings is compared in West Germany, the Netherlands and Great Britain using 1989 ISSP data. Human capital earnings functions for married males and married females are estimated. Discrimination is measured using standard decomposition techniques. Earnings discrimination against females in the more comprehensive systems was 37% in West Germany and 39% in the Netherlands, much less than the 61% found for the less comprehensively regulated Great Britain, the latter figure being higher than previous estimates using earlier data. Gender segregation is demonstrated to have contributed to the relative magnitude of discrimination in Great Britain. Copyright 1999 by Oxford University Press.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Oxford University Press in its journal Cambridge Journal of Economics.

    Volume (Year): 23 (1999)
    Issue (Month): 4 (July)
    Pages: 449-64

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    Handle: RePEc:oup:cambje:v:23:y:1999:i:4:p:449-64

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    Cited by:
    1. Brookes, Mick & Hinks, Timothy & Watson, Duncan, 1999. "Comparisons in Gender Wage Differentials and Discrimination between Germany and the United Kingdom," IRISS Working Paper Series 1999-02, IRISS at CEPS/INSTEAD.
    2. Uwe Jirjahn, 2011. "Gender, Worker Representation and the Profitability of Firms in Germany," Research Papers in Economics 2011-06, University of Trier, Department of Economics.
    3. Michal Myck & Gillian Paull, 2001. "The role of employment experience in explaining the gender wage gap," IFS Working Papers W01/18, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
    4. Kaiser, Lutz C., 2014. "The Gender-Career Estimation Gap," IZA Discussion Papers 8185, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. Peter Dawson & Timothy Hinks & Duncan Watson, 2001. "German Wage Underpayment: An Investigation into Labor Market Inefficiency and Discrimination," Vierteljahrshefte zur Wirtschaftsforschung / Quarterly Journal of Economic Research, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research, vol. 70(1), pages 107-114.

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