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Fiscal Federalism and Welfare Policy: The Role of States in the Growth of Child SSI

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  • Kubik, Jeffrey D.
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    Abstract

    The liberalization of the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program in 1990 allowed many children receiving assistance from AFDC to enroll in SSI instead. Because of differences in the federal funding rules for these two programs, many state governments saved money by steering children from AFDC to SSI. I calculate this financial gain to states and present evidence that state fiscal considerations influenced the movement of children between welfare programs; states experiencing negative fiscal shocks were more likely to encourage these moves. These findings are important for predicting state responses to future adverse fiscal shocks in this post-welfare reform era.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by National Tax Association in its journal National Tax Journal.

    Volume (Year): 56 (2003)
    Issue (Month): 1 (March Citation: 56 National Tax Journal 61-79 (March 2003))
    Pages: 61-79

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    Handle: RePEc:ntj:journl:v:56:y:2003:i:1:p:61-79

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    Cited by:
    1. Mark G. Duggan & Melissa Schettini Kearney, 2007. "The impact of child SSI enrollment on household outcomes," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 26(4), pages 861-886.
    2. Duggan, Mark & Singleton, Perry & Song, Jae, 2007. "Aching to retire? The rise in the full retirement age and its impact on the social security disability rolls," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 91(7-8), pages 1327-1350, August.
    3. Mark Duggan & Melissa Schettini Kearney, 2005. "The Impact of Child SSI Enrollment on Household Outcomes: Evidence from the Survey of Income and Program Participation," NBER Working Papers 11568, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Lex Borghans & Anne C. Gielen & Erzo F.P. Luttmer, 2012. "Social Support Substitution and the Earnings Rebound: Evidence from a Regression Discontinuity in Disability Insurance Reform," NBER Working Papers 18261, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Lynn A. Karoly & Paul S. Davies, 2004. "The Impact of the 1996 SSI Childhood Disability Reforms: Evidence from Matched SIPP-SSA Data," Working Papers wp079, University of Michigan, Michigan Retirement Research Center.
    6. Mark Duggan & Perry Singleton & Jae Song, 2005. "Aching to Retire? The Rise in the Full Retirement Age and its Impact on the Disability Rolls," NBER Working Papers 11811, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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