Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login

Executive Selection in the European Union: Does the Commission President Investiture Procedure Reduce the Democratic Deficit?

Contents:

Author Info

  • Hix, Simon
Registered author(s):

    Abstract

    Central to all democratic systems is the ability of citizens to choose who holds executive power. To reduce the democratic-deficit in the EU, therefore, the Maastricht and Amsterdam Treaties give the European Parliament (EP) a vote on the European Council nominee for Commission President. The effect, so many commentators claim, is a parliamentary model: where EP elections are connected via an EP majority to executive selection. However, these claims are misplaced. There are no incentives for national parties to compete for the Commission President, and every incentive for MEPs to abide by national-party rather than EP-party wishes. The result is that EP elections are �second-order national contests�, fought by national parties on national executive performance, and that the winning coalition in the investiture procedure is of �prime ministers� parties� not of �EP election victors�. Consequently, for a parliamentary model to work, either the EP should �go first� in the investiture process, or the link between domestic parties and MEPs should be broken. However, if EP elections remain second-order, the only option may be a presidential model, where the Commission President is directly-elected.

    Download Info

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
    File URL: http://eiop.or.at/eiop/texte/1997-021a.htm
    File Function: Abstract
    Download Restriction: no

    File URL: http://eiop.or.at/eiop/texte/1997-021.htm
    File Function: Full text
    Download Restriction: no

    File URL: http://eiop.or.at/eiop/pdf/1997-021.pdf
    File Function: Full text
    Download Restriction: no

    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by European Community Studies Association Austria (ECSA-A) in its journal European Integration online Papers (EIoP).

    Volume (Year): 1 (1997)
    Issue (Month): (November)
    Pages:

    as in new window
    Handle: RePEc:erp:eiopxx:p0022

    Contact details of provider:
    Email:
    Web page: http://www2.wu-wien.ac.at/ecsa/
    More information through EDIRC

    Order Information:
    Web: http://eiop.or.at/eiop/

    Related research

    Keywords: IGC 1996; European Parliament; European Commission; investiture procedure; Amsterdam Treaty; institutions; European elections; democracy; political science;

    References

    No references listed on IDEAS
    You can help add them by filling out this form.

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as in new window

    Cited by:
    1. Stefan Napel & Mika Widgrén, 2006. "The European Commission – Appointment, Preferences and Institutional Relations," Discussion Papers 6, Aboa Centre for Economics.
    2. Muntean, Andrei M., 2000. "The European Parliament�s Political Legitimacy and the Commission�s �Misleading Management�: Towards a �Parliamentarian� European Union?," European Integration online Papers (EIoP), European Community Studies Association Austria (ECSA-A), vol. 4, 05.

    Lists

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:erp:eiopxx:p0022. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Editorial Assistant).

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.