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A comparative analysis of remuneration models for pharmaceutical professional services

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  • Bernsten, Cecilia
  • Andersson, Karolina
  • Gariepy, Yves
  • Simoens, Steven
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    Abstract

    Objectives Pharmacists provide a wide range of professional services to support the appropriate use of medicines by patients. This study aims to conduct an international, comparative analysis of remuneration models for pharmaceutical professional services.Methods Information about remuneration models was derived from a literature review and a semi-structured questionnaire completed by experts.Results Remuneration models differ in the way that pharmacists are paid for professional services beyond dispensing medicines. Also, the scope of services that are remunerated varies. The majority of countries regulate remuneration for services only when the medicine is paid for under the reimbursement scheme. Remuneration of services implies a commitment to assure their quality in some countries. Collaborative practice models have been set up where pharmacists work together with other health care professionals to deliver diagnosis-specific services or services based on the patient's use of medicines. The remuneration of services is influenced by the value of services, budgetary constraints, the payer perspective, and the attitude of physicians, pharmacists and patients.Conclusions Professional organisations need to formulate a clear strategy for developing and gaining remuneration for pharmaceutical professional services. This implies that pharmacists not only demonstrate the value of services, but also assure their quality.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Health Policy.

    Volume (Year): 95 (2010)
    Issue (Month): 1 (April)
    Pages: 1-9

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:hepoli:v:95:y:2010:i:1:p:1-9

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    Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/healthpol

    Related research

    Keywords: Remuneration Pharmaceutical professional services Community pharmacy Comparative analysis;

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    Cited by:
    1. Wagner, Andrew & Noyce, Peter R. & Ashcroft, Darren M., 2011. "Changing patient consultation patterns in primary care: an investigation of uptake of the Minor Ailments Service in Scotland," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 99(1), pages 44-51, January.

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