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Ethnicity and Educational Achievement in Compulsory Schooling

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Author Info

  • Christian Dustmann
  • Stephen Machin
  • Uta Schönberg

Abstract

This article documents that at the start of school, pupils from most ethnic groups substantially lag behind White British pupils. However, these gaps decline for all groups throughout compulsory schooling. Language is the single most important factor why ethnic minority pupils improve relative to White British pupils. Poverty, in contrast, does not contribute to the catch-up. Our results also suggest the possibility that the greater than average progress of ethnic minority pupils in schools with more poor pupils may partly be related to teacher incentives to concentrate attention on particular pupils, generated by the publication of school league tables. Copyright � The Author(s). Journal compilation � Royal Economic Society 2010.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Royal Economic Society in its journal The Economic Journal.

Volume (Year): 120 (2010)
Issue (Month): 546 (08)
Pages: F272-F297

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Handle: RePEc:ecj:econjl:v:120:y:2010:i:546:p:f272-f297

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Cited by:
  1. Stijn Baert & Bart Cockx, 2013. "Pure Ethnic Gaps in Educational Attainment and School to Work Transitions. When do they Arise?," CESifo Working Paper Series 4162, CESifo Group Munich.
  2. Christian Dustmann & Tommaso Frattini & Gianandrea Lanzara, 2011. "Educational Achievement of Second Generation Immigrants: An International Comparison," Norface Discussion Paper Series 2011025, Norface Research Programme on Migration, Department of Economics, University College London.
  3. Miranda, Alfonso & Zhu, Yu, 2013. "The Causal Effect of Deficiency at English on Female Immigrants' Labor Market Outcomes in the UK," IZA Discussion Papers 7841, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  4. Sweetman, Arthur & van Ours, Jan C., 2014. "Immigration: What about the Children and Grandchildren?," IZA Discussion Papers 7919, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  5. Christian Dustmann & Tommaso Frattini & Nikolaos Theodoropoulos, 2010. "Ethnicity and Second Generation Immigrants in Britain," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 1004, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.

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