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Trade, Technology, and Wages: General Equilibrium Mechanics

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  • Francois, Joseph F
  • Nelson, Douglas

Abstract

This paper highlights analytical reasons why we believe trade and technology are linked to wagemovements in general, and how we should organize our examination of the recent episode of wage andemployment erosion in the OECD countries. We start with a graphic tour through the mechanics ofgeneral equilibrium theory on trade and wages. This provides a set of implied relationships betweenwages and factor intensity trends that, together, provide a casual test of the consistency of positedrelationships with actual trends. Numeric analysis and a review of the general equilibrium empiricalliterature follow the theoretical overview.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Royal Economic Society in its journal The Economic Journal.

Volume (Year): 108 (1998)
Issue (Month): 450 (September)
Pages: 1483-99

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Handle: RePEc:ecj:econjl:v:108:y:1998:i:450:p:1483-99

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Cited by:
  1. J. Peter Neary, 2000. "Competition, Trade and Wages," Working Papers 200020, School Of Economics, University College Dublin.
  2. Lisandro Abrego & John Whalley, 2002. "Decomposing Wage Inequality Change Using General Equilibrium Models," NBER Working Papers 9184, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Niven Winchester, 2006. "Trade and Rising Wage Inequality: What can we learn from a Decade of Computable General Equilibrium Analysis?," Working Papers 0606, University of Otago, Department of Economics, revised Oct 2006.
  4. Yang, Y. & Tyers, R., 1999. "The Asian Recession and Northern Labour Markets," Papers 372, Australian National University - Department of Economics.
  5. Matthias Lücke, 1999. "Sectoral Value Added Prices, TFP Growth, and the Low-Skilled Wage in High-Income Countries," Kiel Working Papers 923, Kiel Institute for the World Economy.
  6. A. R. Kemal & Rehana Siddiqui & Rizwana Siddiqui & M. Ali Kemal, 2003. "An Assessment of the Impact of Trade Liberalisation on Welfare in Pakistan: A General Equilibrium Analysis," MIMAP Technical Paper Series 2003:16, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics.
  7. Lisandro Abrego & John Whalley, 1999. "The Choice of Structural Model in Trade-Wages Decompositions," CSGR Working papers series 34/99, Centre for the Study of Globalisation and Regionalisation (CSGR), University of Warwick.
  8. Robertson, Raymond, 2004. "Relative prices and wage inequality: evidence from Mexico," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 64(2), pages 387-409, December.
  9. Ethier, Wilfred J., 2005. "Globalization, globalisation: Trade, technology, and wages," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 14(3), pages 237-258.
  10. Niven Winchester & David Greenaway & Geoffrey V. Reed, 2006. "Skill Classification and the Effects of Trade on Wage Inequality," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer, vol. 142(2), pages 287-306, July.
  11. Willem Molle, 2002. "Globalization, Regionalism and Labour Markets: Should We Recast the Foundations of the EU Regime in Matters of Regional (Rural and Urban) Development?," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 36(2), pages 161-172.
  12. Thierfelder, Karen & Robinson, Sherman, 2002. "Trade and tradability," TMD discussion papers 93, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  13. Beladi, Hamid & Chao, Chi-Chur, 2010. "Downsizing, wage inequality and welfare in a developing economy," Research in Economics, Elsevier, vol. 64(4), pages 224-228, December.
  14. Naude, Willem & Coetzee, Rian, 2004. "Globalisation and inequality in South Africa: modelling the labour market transmission," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 26(8-9), pages 911-925, December.
  15. Fontagne, Lionel & Mirza, Daniel, 2007. "International trade and rent sharing among developed and developing countries," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 24(3), pages 523-558, May.
  16. Chao, Chi-Chur & Laffargue, Jean-Pierre & Sgro, Pasquale M., 2012. "Environmental control, wage inequality and national welfare in a tourism economy," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 201-207.
  17. Wilfred J. Ethier, 2002. "Globalization, Globalisation," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 02-088/2, Tinbergen Institute.
  18. Beladi, Hamid & Chao, Chi-Chur & Hollas, Daniel, 2013. "How growing asset inequality affects developing economies," Journal of Economics and Business, Elsevier, vol. 68(C), pages 43-51.
  19. Rod Tyers, 2014. "International Effects of China’s Rise and Transition: Neoclassical and Keynesian Perspectives," CAMA Working Papers 2014-05, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.

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