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Long-run Lunacy, Short-run Sanity: a Simple Model of Trade with Labor Market Turnover

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Author Info

  • Carl Davidson
  • Steven J. Matusz

Abstract

It is often argued that international trade is all about long-run relationships. In this paper, we argue that this view is flawed when factor markets are characterized by turnover. Toward that end, we provide a simple dynamic model of trade with labor market turnover and show that the relationship between the economy's short-run and long-run behavior is more complex than in traditional trade models. For example, in the short run, the economy may produce outside of its long-run frontier. We show that focusing on long-run relationships can lead one to draw faulty policy conclusions, while focusing on its short-run behavior restores sanity. The implication is that in the presence of factor market turnover, international trade issues can only be understood by studying the entire dynamic path of the economy. Long-run relationships should be ignored. Copyright � 2006 The Authors; Journal compilation � 2006 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Wiley Blackwell in its journal Review of International Economics.

Volume (Year): 14 (2006)
Issue (Month): 2 (05)
Pages: 261-276

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Handle: RePEc:bla:reviec:v:14:y:2006:i:2:p:261-276

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Cited by:
  1. Helpman, Elhanan & Itskhoki, Oleg, 2009. "Labor Market Rigidities, Trade, and Unemployment," CEPR Discussion Papers 7502, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  2. Mario Larch & Wolfgang Lechthaler, 2013. "Whom to send to Doha? The Short-sighted Ones!," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 16(4), pages 634-649, October.
  3. Mazumder, Debojyoti, 2013. "Inheritance, Search Friction and International Trade: A General Equilibrium Model," MPRA Paper 55250, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  4. Paul Maarek & Bruno Decreuse, 2013. "FDI and the labor share in developing countries: A theory and some evidence," THEMA Working Papers 2013-20, THEMA (THéorie Economique, Modélisation et Applications), Université de Cergy-Pontoise.
  5. Braun, Sebastian & Lechthaler, Wolfgang & Mileva, Mariya, 2014. "The effects of globalization on wage inequality: New insights from a dynamic trade model with heterogeneous firms," Kiel Policy Brief 70, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
  6. Heiwai Tang, 2010. "Labor Market Institutions, Firm-specific Skills, and Trade Patterns," Development Working Papers 301, Centro Studi Luca d\'Agliano, University of Milano.
  7. Emily Blanchard & Gerald Willmann, 2007. "Political Stasis or Protectionist Rut? Policy Mechanisms for Trade Reform in a Democracy," CESifo Working Paper Series 2070, CESifo Group Munich.

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