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Health, Human Capital, and Development

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  • Hoyt Bleakley

    ()
    (Booth School of Business, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637)

Abstract

How much does disease depress development in human capital and income around the world? I discuss a range of micro evidence, which finds that health is both human capital itself and an input to producing other forms of human capital. I use a standard model to integrate these results and suggest a reinterpretation of much of the micro literature. I then discuss the aggregate implications of micro estimates but note the complications in extrapolating to general equilibrium, especially because of health's effect on population size. I also review the macro evidence on this topic, which consists of either cross-country comparisons or measuring responses to health shocks. Micro estimates are one to two orders of magnitude smaller than the cross-country relationship but nevertheless imply high benefit-to-cost ratios from improving certain forms of health.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Annual Reviews in its journal Annual Review of Economics.

Volume (Year): 2 (2010)
Issue (Month): 1 (09)
Pages: 283-310

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Handle: RePEc:anr:reveco:v:2:y:2010:p:283-310

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Related research

Keywords: disease; income; schooling; economic growth; envelope theorem;

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Cited by:
  1. Atheendar S. Venkataramani & K.R. Shanmugam & Jennifer Prah Ruger, 2006. "Health, Technical Efficiency and Agricultural Production in Indian Districts," Working Papers 2006-011, Madras School of Economics,Chennai,India.
  2. Ampaabeng, Samuel K. & Tan, Chih Ming, 2013. "The long-term cognitive consequences of early childhood malnutrition: The case of famine in Ghana," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(6), pages 1013-1027.
  3. Hansen, Casper Worm, 2013. "Life expectancy and human capital: Evidence from the international epidemiological transition," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(6), pages 1142-1152.
  4. Adam Isen & Maya Rossin-Slater & W. Reed Walker, 2014. "Every Breath You Take – Every Dollar You’ll Make: The Long-Term Consequences of the Clean Air Act of 1970," NBER Working Papers 19858, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Casper Worm Hansen, 2012. "Causes of mortality and development: Evidence from large health shocks in 20th century America," Economics Working Papers 2012-29, School of Economics and Management, University of Aarhus.
  6. Kumar, Santosh & Dansereau, Emily & Murray, Chris, 2012. "Does Distance matter for Institutional Delivery in Rural India? An Instrumental Variable Approach," MPRA Paper 45762, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 01 Jan 2013.
  7. Samuel K. Ampaabeng & Chih Ming Tang, 2012. "The Long-Term Cognitive Consequences of Early Childhood Malnutrition: The Case of Famine in Ghana," Working Paper Series 64_12, The Rimini Centre for Economic Analysis.
  8. Hong, Sok Chul, 2013. "Malaria: An early indicator of later disease and work level," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(3), pages 612-632.
  9. Venkataramani, Atheendar S., 2012. "Early life exposure to malaria and cognition in adulthood: Evidence from Mexico," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 31(5), pages 767-780.
  10. Kodila-Tedika, Oasis, 2014. "Education, paludisme et moustiquaires imprégnées d'insecticide en Afrique sub-saharienne," MPRA Paper 55913, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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