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International growth spillovers, geography and infrastructure

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  • Roberts, Mark
  • Deichmann, Uwe

Abstract

There is significant academic evidence that growth in one country tends to have a positive impact on growth in neighboring countries. This paper contributes to this literature by assessing whether growth spillovers tend to vary significantly across world regions and by investigating the contribution of transport and communication infrastructure in promoting neighborhood effects. The study is global, but the main interest is on Sub-Saharan Africa. The authors define neighborhoods both in geographic terms and by membership in the same regional trade association. The analysis finds significant evidence for heterogeneity in growth spillovers, which are strong between OECD countries and essentially absent in Sub-Saharan Africa. The analysis further finds strong interaction between infrastructure and being a landlocked country. This suggests that growth spillovers from regional"success stories"in Sub-Saharan Africa and other lagging world regions will depend on first strengthening the channels through which such spillovers can spread -- most importantly infrastructure endowments.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by The World Bank in its series Policy Research Working Paper Series with number 5153.

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Date of creation: 01 Dec 2009
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Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:5153

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Related research

Keywords: Achieving Shared Growth; Transport Economics Policy&Planning; Economic Growth; Economic Theory&Research; Country Strategy&Performance;

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Cited by:
  1. Roberto Bonfatti & Steven Poelhekke, 2013. "From Mine to Coast; Transport infrastructure and the direction of trade in developing countries," OxCarre Working Papers, Oxford Centre for the Analysis of Resource Rich Economies, University of Oxford 107, Oxford Centre for the Analysis of Resource Rich Economies, University of Oxford.
  2. Brian Piper, 2014. "Growing at Your Neighbor’s Expense? A Spatial examination of growth in the Americas," Working Papers, Sam Houston State University, Department of Economics and International Business 1402, Sam Houston State University, Department of Economics and International Business.
  3. repec:dgr:uvatin:2013042 is not listed on IDEAS
  4. Warwick McKibbin & Andrew B Stoeckel & YingYing Lu, 2012. "Global Fiscal Adjustment and Trade Rebalancing," CAMA Working Papers 2012-12, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
  5. Warwick McKibbin & Timo Henckel, 2010. "The Economics of Infrastructure in a Globalized World: Issues, Lessons and Future Challenges," CAMA Working Papers 2010-39, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
  6. Brian Piper, 2014. "Factor-Specific Productivity," Working Papers, Sam Houston State University, Department of Economics and International Business 1401, Sam Houston State University, Department of Economics and International Business.

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