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Patterns of long term growth in Sub-Saharan Africa

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Author Info

  • Arbache, Jorge Saba
  • Page, John

Abstract

Using the most recent purchasing power parity data for 44 sub-Saharan African countries, this paper examines the characteristics of long run growth in Africa between 1975 and 2005. The authors investigate the following issues: cross-country income structure, income convergence, the country level distribution of income, growth and income persistence, and formation of convergence clubs.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by The World Bank in its series Policy Research Working Paper Series with number 4398.

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Date of creation: 01 Nov 2007
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:4398

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Related research

Keywords: Economic Conditions and Volatility; Economic Theory&Research; Achieving Shared Growth; Economic Growth; Inequality;

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Cited by:
  1. Laura N. Beny & Lisa D. Cook, 2009. "Metals or Management? Explaining Africa's Recent Economic Growth Performance," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 99(2), pages 268-74, May.
  2. Nicole Alice Sindzingre, 2011. "The Rise of China in Sub-Saharan Africa: its Ambiguous Economic Impacts," Post-Print halshs-00636022, HAL.
  3. Arbache, Jorge Saba & Page, John, 2008. "Hunting for Leopards: Long-Run Country Income Dynamics in Africa," Working Paper Series RP2008/80, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
  4. Christina Wieser, 2011. "Determinants of the Growth Elasticity of Poverty Reduction. Why the Impact on Poverty Reduction is Large in Some Developing Countries and Small in Others," WIFO Working Papers 406, WIFO.
  5. Lee Robinson & Alice Nicole Sindzingre, 2012. "China’s Ambiguous Impacts on Commodity-Dependent Countries: the Example of Sub-Saharan Africa (with a Focus on Zambia)," EconomiX Working Papers 2012-39, University of Paris West - Nanterre la Défense, EconomiX.

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