Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

More growth or fewer collapses ? a new look at long run growth in Sub-Saharan Africa

Contents:

Author Info

  • Arbache, Jorge Saba
  • Page, John

Abstract

Low and highly volatile growth define Africa's growth experience. But there is no evidence that growth volatility is associated to long term economic performance. This result may be misleading if it suggests that volatility is not important for economic and social progress. In this paper we use a variant of the method developed by Hausmann, Pritchett, and Rodrik (2005) to identify both growth acceleration and deceleration episodes in Africa between 1975 and 2005. The authors find that Africa has had numerous growth acceleration episodes in the last 30 years, but also nearly a comparable number of growth collapses, offsetting most of the benefits of growth. Had Africa avoided its growth collapses, it would have grown 1.7 percent a year instead of 0.7 percent, and its GDP per capita would have been more than 30 percent higher in 2005. The authors also find that growth accelerations and decelerations have an asymmetric impact on human development outcomes. Finally, our results suggest that it is easier to identify the likely institutional and policy origins of growth decelerations than of growth accelerations.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://www-wds.worldbank.org/servlet/WDSContentServer/WDSP/IB/2007/11/09/000158349_20071109102535/Rendered/PDF/wps4384.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by The World Bank in its series Policy Research Working Paper Series with number 4384.

as in new window
Length:
Date of creation: 01 Nov 2007
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:4384

Contact details of provider:
Postal: 1818 H Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20433
Phone: (202) 477-1234
Email:
Web page: http://www.worldbank.org/
More information through EDIRC

Related research

Keywords: Governance Indicators; Achieving Shared Growth; Economic Conditions and Volatility; Economic Growth; Nutrition;

This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

References

No references listed on IDEAS
You can help add them by filling out this form.

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Sara Guerschanik Calvo, 2010. "The Global Financial Crisis of 2008-10: A View from the Social Sectors," Human Development Research Papers (2009 to present) HDRP-2010-18, Human Development Report Office (HDRO), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP).
  2. Arbache, Jorge Saba & Page, John, 2008. "Hunting for Leopards: Long-Run Country Income Dynamics in Africa," Working Paper Series RP2008/80, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
  3. Naudé, Wim, 2010. "Africa and the global economic crisis: A Risk assessment and action guide," MPRA Paper 19856, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  4. Fabrizio Coricelli & Aikaterini Karadimitropoulou & Miguel A. León-Ledesma, 2012. "A Disaggregate Characterisation of Recessions," Studies in Economics 1209, Department of Economics, University of Kent.
  5. Dimitris Christopoulos & Miguel León-Ledesma, 2009. "Efficiency and frontier technology in the aftermath of recessions: international evidence," Studies in Economics 0922, Department of Economics, University of Kent.
  6. Hallward-Driemeier, Mary & Khun-Jush, Gita & Pritchett, Lant, 2010. "Deals Versus Rules: Policy Implementation Uncertainty and Why Firms Hate It," Scholarly Articles 4448884, Harvard Kennedy School of Government.
  7. Caroline Harper & Nicola Jones & Andy McKay, 2010. "Including Children in Policy Responses to Economic Crises," Working papers 1003, UNICEF,Division of Policy and Strategy.
  8. Page, John, 2011. "Should Africa Industrialize?," Working Paper Series UNU-WIDER Research Paper , World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
  9. Pedro Conceição & Sebastian Levine, 2011. "The African Moment: On the Brink of a Development Breakthrough," Working Papers 2011-001, United Nations Development Programme, Regional Bureau for Africa (UNDP/RBA).
  10. World Bank, 2009. "Global Economic Prospects 2009 : Commodities at the Crossroads," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 2581, October.
  11. Grenade, Kari & Pasha, Sukrishnalall, 2012. "Accelerating Guyana’s Growth Momentum," MPRA Paper 41960, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  12. Nicole Alice Sindzingre, 2008. "From Growth to Poverty Reduction: a New Conceptual Framework in Development Economics," Post-Print halshs-00648001, HAL.
  13. Guillaumont, Patrick & Wagner, Laurent, 2012. "Aid and Growth Accelerations: Vulnerability Matters," Working Paper Series UNU-WIDER Research Paper , World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:4384. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Roula I. Yazigi).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.