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How Public Spending Can Help You Grow : An Empirical Analysis for Developing Countries

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  • Blanca Moreno-Dodson
  • Nihal Bayraktar
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    File URL: https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/bitstream/handle/10986/10107/593810BRI0EP480Box358280B01PUBLIC1.pdf?sequence=1
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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by The World Bank in its series World Bank Other Operational Studies with number 10107.

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    Date of creation: Feb 2011
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    Handle: RePEc:wbk:wboper:10107

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    Keywords: Public Sector Economics Poverty Reduction - Inequality Public Sector Expenditure Policy Finance and Financial Sector Development - Debt Markets Poverty Reduction - Achieving Shared Growth Public Sector Development;

    References

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    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
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    1. Barro, Robert J., 1990. "Government Spending in a Simple Model of Endogeneous Growth," Scholarly Articles, Harvard University Department of Economics 3451296, Harvard University Department of Economics.
    2. Sanjeev Gupta & Alejandro Simone & Alex Segura-Ubiergo, 2006. "New Evidenceon Fiscal Adjustment and Growth in Transition Economies," IMF Working Papers, International Monetary Fund 06/244, International Monetary Fund.
    3. James Ang, 2009. "Do public investment and FDI crowd in or crowd out private domestic investment in Malaysia?," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 41(7), pages 913-919.
    4. Olivier Blanchard & Francesco Giavazzi, 2002. "Current Account Deficits in the Euro Area: The End of the Feldstein Horioka Puzzle?," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 33(2), pages 147-210.
    5. Benos, Nikos, 2009. "Fiscal policy and economic growth: empirical evidence from EU countries," MPRA Paper, University Library of Munich, Germany 19174, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Sugata Ghosh & Andros Gregoriou, 2008. "The composition of government spending and growth: is current or capital spending better?," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, Oxford University Press, vol. 60(3), pages 484-516, July.
    7. Niloy Bose & M. Emranul Haque & Denise R. Osborn, 2007. "Public Expenditure And Economic Growth: A Disaggregated Analysis For Developing Countries," Manchester School, University of Manchester, University of Manchester, vol. 75(5), pages 533-556, 09.
    8. Moreno-Dodson, Blanca, 2008. "Assessing the impact of public spending on growth - an empirical analysis for seven fast growing countries," Policy Research Working Paper Series, The World Bank 4663, The World Bank.
    9. Bayraktar, Nihal & Moreno-Dodson, Blanca, 2010. "How can public spending help you grow? an empirical analysis for developing countries," Policy Research Working Paper Series, The World Bank 5367, The World Bank.
    10. Kneller, Richard & Bleaney, Michael F. & Gemmell, Norman, 1999. "Fiscal policy and growth: evidence from OECD countries," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 74(2), pages 171-190, November.
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