Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Do Tax Structures Affect Aggregate Economic Growth?: Empirical Evidence from a Panel of OECD Countries

Contents:

Author Info

  • Jens Arnold

Abstract

This paper examines the relationship between tax structures and economic growth by entering indicators of the tax structure into a set of panel growth regressions for 21 OECD countries, in which both the accumulation of physical and human capital are accounted for. The results of the analysis suggest that income taxes are generally associated with lower economic growth than taxes on consumption and property. More precisely, the findings allow the establishment of a ranking of tax instruments with respect to their relationship to economic growth. Property taxes, and particularly recurrent taxes on immovable property, seem to be the most growth-friendly, followed by consumption taxes and then by personal income taxes. Corporate income taxes appear to have the most negative effect on GDP per capita. These findings suggest that a revenue-neutral growth-oriented tax reform would be to shift part of the revenue base towards recurrent property and consumption taxes and away from income taxes, especially corporate taxes. There is also evidence of a negative relationship between the progressivity of personal income taxes and growth. All of the results are robust to a number of different specifications, including controlling for other determinants of economic growth and instrumenting tax indicators. La structure fiscale a-t-elle un effet sur la croissance économique ? : Évidences empiriques d'un panel de pays de l'OCDE Cet article étudie le lien entre la structure de la fiscalité et la croissance économique. L’analyse empirique inclut des indicateurs sur la répartition des taxes dans des équations de croissance pour un panel de 21 pays de l’OCDE, en prenant en compte l’accumulation du capital physique et du capital humain. Les résultats montrent que les impôts sur le revenu sont en général associés avec une croissance plus faible que celle associée aux impôts sur la consommation et sur le patrimoine. Plus précisément, nous établissons un classement des instruments de taxation au regard de leur lien avec la croissance. Les impôts sur le patrimoine, et particulièrement les impôts périodiques sur la propriété immobilière, semblent être les plus favorables à la croissance, suivies immédiatement des impôts sur la consommation. Les impôts sur le revenu des individus semblent être significativement moins favorables, et les impôts sur le revenu des sociétés ont les effets les plus négatifs sur le PIB par tête. Ces résultats suggèrent que les réformes augmentant les impôts sur le patrimoine et la consommation au détriment de ceux sur les entreprises seraient susceptibles d’améliorer les perspectives de croissance économique. L’article trouve également les signes d’une relation négative entre la progressivité des impôts sur le revenu des individus et la croissance. Tous les résultats précédents sont robustes à différentes spécifications, incluant le contrôle des autres déterminants de la croissance économique et l’instrumentation des indicateurs de taxation.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/236001777843
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by OECD Publishing in its series OECD Economics Department Working Papers with number 643.

as in new window
Length:
Date of creation: 09 Oct 2008
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:oec:ecoaaa:643-en

Contact details of provider:
Postal: 2 rue Andre Pascal, 75775 Paris Cedex 16
Phone: 33-(0)-1-45 24 82 00
Fax: 33-(0)-1-45 24 85 00
Email:
Web page: http://www.oecd.org
More information through EDIRC

Related research

Keywords: growth; fiscal policy; croissance; politique fiscale;

Find related papers by JEL classification:

This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

References

No references listed on IDEAS
You can help add them by filling out this form.

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Carine Bouthevillain & John Caruana & Cristina Checherita & Jorge Cunha & Esther Gordo & Stephan Haroutunian & Amela Hubic & Geert Langenus & Bernhard Manzke & Javier J. Pérez & Pietro Tommasino, 2009. "Pros and Cons of various fiscal measures to stimulate the economy," BCL working papers 40, Central Bank of Luxembourg.
  2. Dackehag , Margareta & Hansson, Åsa, 2012. "Taxation of Income and Economic Growth: An Empirical Analysis of 25 Rich OECD Countries," Working Papers 2012:6, Lund University, Department of Economics.
  3. Romain Bouis & Romain Duval & Fabrice Murtin, 2011. "The Policy and Institutional Drivers of Economic Growth Across OECD and Non-OECD Economies: New Evidence from Growth Regressions," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 843, OECD Publishing.
  4. Ruud de Mooij & Michael Keen, 2012. "'Fiscal Devaluation' and Fiscal Consolidation: The VAT in Troubled Times," NBER Working Papers 17913, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. World Bank, 2011. "Climate Change and Fiscal Policy : A Report for APEC," World Bank Other Operational Studies 2734, The World Bank.
  6. Santiago Tobón Zapata & Juan Carlos Muñoz-Mora, 2013. "Impuesto predial y desarrollo económico. Aproximación a la relación entre el impuesto predial y la inversión de los municipios de Antioquia," REVISTA ECOS DE ECONOMÍA, UNIVERSIDAD EAFIT.
  7. European Commission, 2012. "Taxation trends in the European Union: 2012 edition," Taxation trends 2012, Directorate General Taxation and Customs Union, European Commission.
  8. Christopher Heady & Åsa Johansson & Jens Arnold & Bert Brys & Laura Vartia, 2009. "Tax Policy for Economic Recovery and Growth," Studies in Economics 0925, Department of Economics, University of Kent.
  9. Elek, Péter & Kiss, Áron, 2010. "Az ingatlanadó a magyar adórendszerben. Elméleti megfontolások és mikroszimulációs elemzés
    [Real-estate taxation in the Hungarian tax system. Theoretical considerations and a micro-simulati
    ," Közgazdasági Szemle (Economic Review - monthly of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences), Közgazdasági Szemle Alapítvány (Economic Review Foundation), vol. 0(5), pages 389-411.
  10. Peter Bernholz, 2013. "The Slow and Hidden Road to Serfdom," CESifo Forum, Ifo Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 14(2), pages 61-74, 08.
  11. Sebastian Barnes & Romain Bouis & Philippe Briard & Sean Dougherty & Mehmet Eris, 2013. "The GDP Impact of Reform: A Simple Simulation Framework," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 834, OECD Publishing.
  12. Bev Dahlby & Ergete Ferede, 2011. "What Does it Cost Society to Raise a Dollar of Tax Revenue? The Marginal Cost of Public Funds," C.D. Howe Institute Commentary, C.D. Howe Institute, issue 324, March.
  13. Kenichiro Kashiwase & Masahiro Nozaki & Kiichi Tokuoka, 2012. "Pension Reforms in Japan," IMF Working Papers 12/285, International Monetary Fund.
  14. Luigi, Bernardi, 2011. "Economic crisis and taxation in Europe," MPRA Paper 31007, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  15. Gemmell, Norman & Kneller, Richard & Sanz, Ismael, 2013. "The Growth Effects of Tax Rates in the OECD," Working Paper Series 2706, Victoria University of Wellington, Chair in Public Finance.
  16. Attinasi, Maria-Grazia & Checherita-Westphal, Cristina & Rieth, Malte, 2011. "Labour tax progressivity and output volatility: evidence from OECD countries," Working Paper Series 1380, European Central Bank.
  17. Hans Pitlik & Margit Schratzenstaller, 2011. "Growth Implications of Structure and Size of Public Sectors," WIFO Working Papers 404, WIFO.
  18. Yaya KEHO, 2011. "Tax Structure and Economic Growth in Cote dIvoire: Are Some Taxes Better Than Others?," Asian Economic and Financial Review, Asian Economic and Social Society, vol. 1(4), pages 226-235, December.
  19. Igor Kotlán & Zuzana Machová, 2012. "The Influence of Corporate Taxation on Economic Growth: The Failure of Tax Quota?," Politická ekonomie, University of Economics, Prague, vol. 2012(6), pages 743-763.
  20. European Commission, 2010. "Tax Policy after the Crisis: Monitoring Tax Revenues and Tax Reforms in EU Member States 2010 Report," Taxation Papers 24, Directorate General Taxation and Customs Union, European Commission.
  21. Doris Prammer, 2011. "Quality of taxation and the crisis: Tax shifts from a growth perspective," Taxation Papers 29, Directorate General Taxation and Customs Union, European Commission.
  22. European Commission, 2011. "Tax Reforms in EU Member States 2011: tax policy challenges for economic growth and fiscal sustainability," Taxation Papers 28, Directorate General Taxation and Customs Union, European Commission.

Lists

This item is featured on the following reading lists or Wikipedia pages:
  1. European Public Finance (ECON-O-403)

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:oec:ecoaaa:643-en. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: ().

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.