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Do R&D tax credits work? Evidence from an international panel of countries 1979-1994

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  • Nick Bloom
  • Rachel Griffith

    ()
    (Institute for Fiscal Studies and University of Manchester)

  • John Van Reenen

Abstract

This paper examines the impact of fiscal incentives on the level of R&D investment. An econometric model of R&D investment is estimated using a new panel of data on tax changes and R&D spending in nine OECD countries over a nineteen year period (1979-1997). We find evidence that tax incentives are effective in increasing R&D intensity. This is true even after allowing for permanent country specific characteristics, world macro shocks and other policy influences. We estimate that a 10 per cent fall in the cost of R&D stimulates just over a 1 per cent rise in the level of R&D in the short-run; and just under a 10 per cent rise in R&D in the long-run.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Institute for Fiscal Studies in its series IFS Working Papers with number W99/08.

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Length: 42 pp.
Date of creation: Nov 1999
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:ifs:ifsewp:99/08

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Cited by:
  1. Bloom, Nick & Griffith, Rachel & Van Reenen, John, 2002. "Do R&D tax credits work? Evidence from a panel of countries 1979-1997," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 85(1), pages 1-31, July.
  2. Griffith, Rachel & Miller, Helen & O'Connell, Martin, 2011. "Corporate taxes and the location of intellectual property," CEPR Discussion Papers 8424, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  3. repec:dgr:unumer:2012056 is not listed on IDEAS
  4. Isabel Busom & Beatriz Corchuelo & Ester Martínez-Ros, 2011. "Tax incentives and direct support for R&D : what do firms use and why?," Business Economics Working Papers id-11-03, Universidad Carlos III, Instituto sobre Desarrollo Empresarial "Carmen Vidal Ballester".
  5. Rachel Griffith & Stephen Redding & John Van Reenen, 2001. "Measuring the cost effectiveness of an R&D tax credit for the UK," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 782, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  6. Beatriz Corchuelo & Ester Martinez-Ros, 2009. "The Effects of Fiscal Incentives for R & D in Spain," Business Economics Working Papers wb092302, Universidad Carlos III, Departamento de Economía de la Empresa.
  7. Tor Jakob Klette & Jarle Møen, 1998. "From Growth Theory to Technology Policy – Coordination Problems in Theory and Practice," Discussion Papers 219, Research Department of Statistics Norway.

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