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The Effects of Wages on Aggregate Employment: A Brief Summary of Empirical Studies

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  • Elizabeth Webster

    (Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne)

Abstract

This paper provides non-technical summaries of theories which posit a relationship between aggregate employment and real wages and presents results from Australian and selected overseas empirical studies. Neoclasssical supply side theories assume that real wages, for given endowments of physical capital, primarily influence the cost of employing labour, and have an inverse relationship to aggregate employment. Keynesian demand side theories maintain that real wages affect both demand for labour as well as the relative costs of employing different techniques of production. Most estimations of the wage elasticity of demand for labour assume that real output is fixed and are thus not proper elasticities of demand. Recent Australian estimates range from -0.15 to -1.0 but the equations are not long run estimates as they include either output or the capital stock as an explanatory variable.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne in its series Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series with number wp2000n14.

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Length: 20 pages
Date of creation: Sep 2000
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:iae:iaewps:wp2000n14

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Postal: Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 Australia
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Cited by:
  1. Marika Karanassou & Hector Sala, 2008. "Labour Market Dynamics in Australia: What Drives Unemployment?," Discussion Papers 2008-26, School of Economics, The University of New South Wales.
  2. Lonnie Stevans, 2009. "The Relationship Among African American Male Earnings, Employment, Incarceration and Immigration in the United States: A Time Series Approach," The Review of Black Political Economy, Springer, vol. 36(3), pages 151-160, December.
  3. Pablo, Agnese, 2009. "Japan and her dealings with offshoring: An empirical analysis with aggregate data," MPRA Paper 16505, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  4. Luis N. Lanteri, 2013. "Determinantes económicos del nivel de empleo. Alguna evidencia para Argentina," Ensayos Revista de Economia, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Facultad de Economia, vol. 0(1), pages 73-100, May.
  5. Pablo, Agnese, 2009. "Employment effects of offshoring. An application to Japanese industries, 1980-2005," MPRA Paper 16506, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  6. Stevans, Lonnie, 2007. "The Relationship Among African American Male Earnings, Employment, Incarceration and Immigration: A Time Series Approach," MPRA Paper 5594, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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