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Sorting Through Affirmative Action: Two Field Experiments in Colombia

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  • Marcela Ibanez

    (Georg-August University Göttingen)

  • Gerhard Riener

    (Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf)

  • Ashok Rai

    (Williams College)

Abstract

Affirmative action is a subject of intense debate. Supporters point to the increased representation of women and minority groups while critics contend that affirmative action can lead to inefficiencies. In this paper we present results from two field experiments that were designed to test how applicants sort in response to affirmative action rules that favor of women. Our results suggest that the criticism of affirmative action is misplaced. We find that affirmative action does not lead to lower standards in the pool of applicants.

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File URL: http://www2.vwl.wiso.uni-goettingen.de/courant-papers/CRC-PEG_DP_150.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Courant Research Centre PEG in its series Courant Research Centre: Poverty, Equity and Growth - Discussion Papers with number 150.

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Date of creation: 18 Sep 2013
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Handle: RePEc:got:gotcrc:150

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Keywords: Field experiment;

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  1. Anand V. Swamy & Stephen Knack & Young Lee & Omar Azfar, 2000. "Gender and Corruption," Department of Economics Working Papers, Department of Economics, Williams College 2000-10, Department of Economics, Williams College.
  2. Raghabendra Chattopadhyay & Esther Duflo, 2004. "Women as policy makers: Evidence from a randomized policy experiment in india," Framed Field Experiments, The Field Experiments Website 00224, The Field Experiments Website.
  3. Thomas Dohmen & Armin Falk & David Huffman & Uwe Sunde & Juergen Schupp & Gert Wagner, 2005. "Individual Risk Attitudes: New Evidence from a Large, Representative, Experimentally-Validated Survey," Working Papers, The Field Experiments Website 2096, The Field Experiments Website.
  4. Balafoutas, Loukas & Sutter, Matthias, 2010. "Gender, Competition and the Efficiency of Policy Intervention," Working Papers in Economics, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics 450, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics.
  5. H. Holzer & D. Neumark, . "Are affirmative action hires less qualified? Evidence from employer-employee data on new hires," Institute for Research on Poverty Discussion Papers, University of Wisconsin Institute for Research on Poverty 1113-96, University of Wisconsin Institute for Research on Poverty.
  6. Muriel Niederle & Carmit Segal & Lise Vesterlund, 2008. "How Costly is Diversity? Affirmative Action in Light of Gender Differences in Competitiveness," NBER Working Papers 13923, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Branisa, Boris & Klasen, Stephan & Ziegler, Maria, 2013. "Gender Inequality in Social Institutions and Gendered Development Outcomes," World Development, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 252-268.
  8. Calsamiglia, Caterina & Franke, Jörg & Rey-Biel, Pedro, 2013. "The incentive effects of affirmative action in a real-effort tournament," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 98(C), pages 15-31.
  9. Nyhus, Ellen K. & Pons, Empar, 2005. "The effects of personality on earnings," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 26(3), pages 363-384, June.
  10. Daniel Zizzo, 2010. "Experimenter demand effects in economic experiments," Experimental Economics, Springer, Springer, vol. 13(1), pages 75-98, March.
  11. Alejandro Badel & Ximena Peña, 2010. "Decomposing the GenderWage Gap with Sample Selection Adjustment: Evidence from Colombia," DOCUMENTOS CEDE, UNIVERSIDAD DE LOS ANDES-CEDE 007725, UNIVERSIDAD DE LOS ANDES-CEDE.
  12. Dickson, Lisa M., 2006. "Does ending affirmative action in college admissions lower the percent of minority students applying to college?," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 25(1), pages 109-119, February.
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