Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

From Universal Food Subsidies to a Self-Targeted Program: A Case Study in Tunisian Reform

Contents:

Author Info

  • Tuck, L.
  • Lindert, K.
Registered author(s):

    Abstract

    Outlines Tunisia' innovative strategy of reducing the budgetary costs of food subsidies in a manner that is politically acceptable and that protects the nutritional status of the poor. The government uses "self-targeted programs," whereby subsidies are shifted to items consumed primarily by low-income groups, while prices of unsubsidized, higher-quality items are liberalized, appealing to higher-income groups who then consume less of the subsidized foods.

    Download Info

    To our knowledge, this item is not available for download. To find whether it is available, there are three options:
    1. Check below under "Related research" whether another version of this item is available online.
    2. Check on the provider's web page whether it is in fact available.
    3. Perform a search for a similarly titled item that would be available.

    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by World Bank in its series World Bank - Discussion Papers with number 351.

    as in new window
    Length: 108 pages
    Date of creation: 1996
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:fth:wobadi:351

    Contact details of provider:
    Postal: THE WORLD BANK; 1818 H STREET, N.W. WASHINGTON, D.C. 20433, U.S.A.
    Phone: (202) 477-1234
    Email:
    Web page: http://www.worldbank.org/
    More information through EDIRC

    Related research

    Keywords: FISCAL POLICY ; AGRICULTURE ; NUTRITION;

    Find related papers by JEL classification:

    References

    No references listed on IDEAS
    You can help add them by filling out this form.

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as in new window

    Cited by:
    1. Sami Bibi & Jean-Yves Duclos, 2004. "Equity and Policy Effectiveness with Imperfect Targeting," Working Papers 0423, Economic Research Forum, revised Oct 2004.
    2. van de Walle, Dominique, 1998. "Targeting Revisited," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, vol. 13(2), pages 231-48, August.
    3. Atashbar, Tohid, 2012. "Illusion therapy: How to impose an economic shock without social pain," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 34(1), pages 99-111.
    4. Mohajan, Haradhan, 2013. "Food, Agriculture and Economic Situation of Bangladesh," MPRA Paper 54240, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 18 Aug 2013.
    5. Quentin Wodon, 2012. "Improving the Targeting of Social Programs in Ghana," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 13082, October.
    6. Adams, Richard H. Jr., 2000. "The politics of economic policy reform in developing countries," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2443, The World Bank.
    7. Mehta, Aashish & Jha, Shikha & Quising, Pilipinas, 2013. "Self-targeted food subsidies and voice: Evidence from the Philippines," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 204-217.
    8. Brown, Lynn & Gentilini, Ugo, 2006. "On the Edge: The Role of Food-based Safety Nets in Helping Vulnerable Households Manage Food Insecurity," Working Paper Series RP2006/111, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    9. Dhehibi, B. & Gil, J. M., 2003. "Forecasting food demand in Tunisia under alternative pricing policies," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 28(2), pages 167-186, April.
    10. Sami Bibi & Jean-Yves Duclos, 2005. "Decomposing poverty changes into vertical and horizontal components," Bulletin of Economic Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 57(2), pages 205-215, 04.
    11. Haddad, Lawrence & Ahmed, Akhter, 2003. "Chronic and Transitory Poverty: Evidence from Egypt, 1997-99," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 31(1), pages 71-85, January.
    12. World Bank, 2002. "Poverty Reduction in Egypt : Diagnosis and Strategy, Volume 1. Main Report," World Bank Other Operational Studies 15398, The World Bank.
    13. Karami, Ayatollah & Esmaeili, Abdoulkarim & Najafi, Bahadin, 2012. "Assessing effects of alternative food subsidy reform in Iran," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 34(5), pages 788-799.
    14. Alderman, Harold & Lindert, Kathy, 1998. "The Potential and Limitations of Self-Targeted Food Subsidies," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, vol. 13(2), pages 213-29, August.
    15. Gutner, Tammi, 1999. "The political economy of food subsidy reform in Egypt," FCND discussion papers 77, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).

    Lists

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:fth:wobadi:351. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Thomas Krichel).

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.