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Estimating a social accounting matrix using cross entropy methods:

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  • Robinson, Sherman
  • Cattaneo, Andrea
  • El-Said, Moataz

Abstract

There is a continuing need to use recent and consistent multisectoral economic data to support policy analysis and the development of economywide models. Updating and estimating input-output tables and social accounting matrices (SAMs), which provides the underlying data framework for this type of model and analysis, for a recent year is a difficult and a challenging problem. The traditional RAS approach requires that we start with a consistent SAM for a particular year and “update” it for a later year given new information on row and column sums. This paper extends the RAS method by proposing a flexible “cross entropy” approach to estimating a consistent SAM starting from inconsistent data estimated with error, a common experience in many countries. The method is flexible and powerful when dealing with scattered and inconsistent data. It allows incorporating errors in variables, inequality constraints, and prior knowledge about any part of the SAM (not just row and column sums). Since the input-output accounts are contained within the SAM framework, updating an input-output table is a special case of the general SAM estimation problem. The paper describes the RAS procedure and “cross entropy” method, and compares the underlying “information theory” and classical statistical approaches to parameter estimation. An example is presented applying the cross entropy approach to data from Mozambique. An appendix includes a listing of the computer code in the GAMS language used in the procedure.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) in its series TMD discussion papers with number 33.

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Date of creation: 1998
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Handle: RePEc:fpr:tmddps:33

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Keywords: Social accounting Mozambique.;

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Cited by:
  1. Morley, Samuel & Piñeiro, Valeria, 2011. "A regional computable general equilibrium model for Guatemala: Modeling exogenous shocks and policy alternatives," IFPRI discussion papers 1137, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  2. Noland, Marcus & Robinson, Sherman & Wang, Tao, 2001. "Famine in North Korea: Causes and Cures," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 49(4), pages 741-67, July.
  3. Michela Sironi & Federico Perali & Maikol Furlani & Alexandrina Ioana Scorbureanu, 2012. "A feasibility analysis of the Jenin Sustainable Industrial and Logistic District," Working Papers 36/2012, University of Verona, Department of Economics.
  4. Ana Corina Miller & Alan Matthews & Trevor Donnellan & Cathal O'Donoghue, 2011. "A 2005 Agriculture-Food SAM (AgriFood-SAM) for Ireland," The Institute for International Integration Studies Discussion Paper Series iiisdp372, IIIS.
  5. Harris, Rebecca Lee, 1999. "The distributional impact of macroeconomic shocks in Mexico: threshold effects in a multi-region CGE model," TMD discussion papers 44, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  6. Chisari, Omar Osvaldo & Mastronardi, Leonardo Javier & Romero, Carlos Adrián, 2012. "Local taxes in Buenos Aires City: A CGE approach," MPRA Paper 40029, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  7. Lofgren, Hans, 2012. "World food prices and human development: Policy simulations for archetype low-income countries," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6033, The World Bank.
  8. Marcus Noland & Sherman Robinson & Tao Wang, 1999. "Modeling Korean Unification," Working Paper Series WP99-7, Peterson Institute for International Economics.
  9. Antoine BOUET & Guillaume GRUERE & Laetitia LEROY, 2010. "The Price and Trade Effects of Strict Information Requirements for Genetically Modified Commodities under the Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety," Working Papers 2010-2011_11, CATT - UPPA - Université de Pau et des Pays de l'Adour, revised Nov 2010.
  10. Fenglong XIAO, 2011. "General Equilibrium Analysis of Electricity Market Liberalization in Singapore: A Comparative Study," Theoretical and Applied Economics, Asociatia Generala a Economistilor din Romania - AGER, vol. 0(12(565)), pages 107-114, December.
  11. Alarcón, Jorge & Ernst, Christoph & Khondker, Bazlul & Sharma, PD, 2011. "Dynamic social accounting matrix (DySAM) : concept, methodology and simulation outcomes: the case of Indonesia and Mozambique," ILO Working Papers 464252, International Labour Organization.
  12. Lofgren, Hans & El-Said, Moataz & Robinson, Sherman, 1999. "Trade liberalization and complementary domestic policies: a rural-urban general equilibrium analysis of Morocco," TMD discussion papers 41, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  13. Giulia Colombo, 2010. "Linking CGE and microsimulation models: a comparison of different approaches," International Journal of Microsimulation, Interational Microsimulation Association, vol. 3(1), pages 72-91.
  14. M. Alejandro Cardenete & Ferran Sancho, 2002. "Sensitivity of Simulation Results to Competing SAM Updates," UFAE and IAE Working Papers 556.02, Unitat de Fonaments de l'Anàlisi Econòmica (UAB) and Institut d'Anàlisi Econòmica (CSIC).
  15. Chisari, Omar Osvaldo & Mastronardi, Leonardo Javier & Romero, Carlos Adrián, 2012. "Building an input-output Model for Buenos Aires City," MPRA Paper 40028, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  16. Lofgren, Hans & El-Said, Moataz, 2001. "Food subsidies in Egypt: reform options, distribution and welfare," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 26(1), pages 65-83, February.
  17. Douillet, Mathilde, 2012. "Trade and agricultural policies in Malawi: Not all policy reform is equally good for the poor," MPRA Paper 40948, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  18. Hyytia, Nina, 2011. "Allocation of CAP modulation funds to rural development measures at the regional level in Finland," 2011 International Congress, August 30-September 2, 2011, Zurich, Switzerland 114525, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
  19. Mastronardi, Leonardo Javier & Romero, Carlos Adrián, 2012. "Estimación de matrices de insumo producto regionales mediante métodos indirectos. Una aplicación para la ciudad de Buenos Aires
    [A non-survey estimation for regional input-output tables. An appl
    ," MPRA Paper 37006, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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