Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login

Global Patterns of Income and Health: Facts, Interpretations, and Policies

Contents:

Author Info

  • Angus S. Deaton

    ()

Abstract

People in poor countries live shorter lives than people in rich countries so that, if we scale income by some index of health, there is more inequality in the world than if we consider income alone. Such international inequalities in life expectancy decreased for many years after 1945, and the strong correlation between income and life-expectancy might lead us to hope that economic growth will improve people’s health as well as their material living conditions. I argue that the apparent convergence in life expectancies is not as beneficial as might appear, and that, while economic growth is the key to poverty reduction, there is no evidence that it will deliver automatic health improvements in the absence of appropriate conditions. The strong negative correlation between economic growth on the one hand and the proportionate rate of decline of infant and child mortality on the other vanishes altogether if we look at the relationship between growth and the absolute rate of decline in infant and child mortality. In effect, the correlation is between the level of infant mortality and the growth of real incomes, most likely reflecting the importance of factors such as education and the quality of institutions that affect both health and growth.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://www.esocialsciences.org/Download/repecDownload.aspx?fname=Document12812200630.8245813.pdf&fcategory=Articles&AId=777&fref=repec
Our checks indicate that this address may not be valid because: 403 Forbidden. If this is indeed the case, please notify (Padma Prakash)
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by eSocialSciences in its series Working Papers with number id:777.

as in new window
Length:
Date of creation: Dec 2006
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:ess:wpaper:id:777

Note: Institutional Papers
Contact details of provider:
Web page: http://www.esocialsciences.org

Related research

Keywords: inequality; income inequalities; life expectancies; infant mortality; child mortality; education; health care institutions; poverty reduction; Health Economics; Health Studies; Economics;

Other versions of this item:

Find related papers by JEL classification:

References

No references listed on IDEAS
You can help add them by filling out this form.

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Bhalotra, Sonia R., 2007. "Fatal Fluctuations? Cyclicality in Infant Mortality in India," IZA Discussion Papers 3086, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  2. Stephan KLASEN & Simon LANGE, 2012. "Getting Progress Right : Measuring Progress Towards the MDGs Against Historical Trends," Working Papers P60, FERDI.
  3. Ximing Wu & Andreas Savvides & Thanasis Stengos, 2008. "The Global Joint Distribution of Income and Health," CESifo Working Paper Series 2367, CESifo Group Munich.
  4. Jones, Nicola & Nguyen, Ngoc Anh & Nguyen, Thu Hang, 2007. "Trade liberalisation and intra-household poverty in Vietnam: a q2 social impact analysis," MPRA Paper 4206, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  5. Headey, Derek, 2011. "Was the Global Food Crisis Really a Crisis?: Simulations versus Self-Reporting," Research briefs 17, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  6. Leandro Prados de la Escosura, 2011. "Human Development in Africa: A Long-Run Perspective," Working Papers 0008, European Historical Economics Society (EHES).
  7. Seema Jayachandran & Adriana Lleras-Muney, 2008. "Life Expectancy and Human Capital Investments: Evidence From Maternal Mortality Declines," NBER Working Papers 13947, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  8. Shinsuke Tanaka, 2008. "Access to Health Infrastructure and Child Health Development: Evidence from Post-Apartheid South Africa," ISER Discussion Paper 0768, Institute of Social and Economic Research, Osaka University, revised Jan 2010.
  9. Jack, William & Lewis, Maureen, 2009. "Health investments and economic growth : macroeconomic evidence and microeconomic foundations," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4877, The World Bank.
  10. Yusuf, Shahid & Nabeshima, Kaoru & Wei Ha, 2007. "What makes cities healthy ?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4107, The World Bank.
  11. David Locke Newhouse & Prachi Mishra, 2007. "Health Aid and Infant Mortality," IMF Working Papers 07/100, International Monetary Fund.
  12. Leonardo Becchetti & Giuseppina Gianfreda, 2008. "When consumption heals producers: the effect of fair trade on marginalised producers’ health and productivity," Working Papers 86, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.
  13. Stephan KLASEN & Simon LANGE, 2012. "Getting Progress Right : Measuring Progress Towards the MDGs Against Historical Trends," Working Papers P60, FERDI.
  14. KAMIYA, Yusuke, 2011. "Effects of Health Systems and Socioeconomic Factors in Reducing Child Mortality in Developing Countries: Empirical Results from System Generalised Method of Moments," Applied Econometrics and International Development, Euro-American Association of Economic Development, vol. 11(2).
  15. Richard Layte & Barbara Clyne, 2010. "Did the Celtic Tiger Decrease Socio-Economic Differentials in Perinatal Mortality in Ireland?," The Economic and Social Review, Economic and Social Studies, vol. 41(2), pages 173-199.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ess:wpaper:id:777. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Padma Prakash).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.