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The costs of risky male behaviour: sex differences in seasonal survival in a small sexually monomorphic primate

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  • Cornelia Kraus

    (Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany)

  • Manfred Eberle
  • Peter M. Kappeler
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    Abstract

    Male excess mortality is widespread among mammals and frequently interpreted as a cost of sexually selected traits that enhance male reproductive success. Sex differences in the propensity to engage in risky behaviours are often invoked to explain the sex gap in survival. Here we aim to isolate and quantify the survival consequences of two potentially risky male behavioural strategies in a small sexually monomorphic primate, the grey mouse lemur Microcebus murinus: (1) Most females hibernate during a large part of the austral winter, whereas most males remain active, and (2) during the brief annual mating season males roam widely in search for receptive females. Using a 10-year capture-mark-recapture data set from a population of M. murinus in Kirindy Forest, western Madagascar, we statistically modelled sex-specific seasonal survival probabilities. Surprisingly, we did not find any evidence for direct survival benefits of hibernation – winter survival did not differ between males and females. In contrast, during the breeding season males survived less well than females (sex gap: 16%). Consistent with the “risky male behaviour”-hypothesis, the period for lowered male survival was restricted to the short mating season. Thus, sex differences in survival can be substantial even in the absence of sexual dimorphism.

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    File URL: http://www.demogr.mpg.de/en/projects_publications/publications_1904/journal_articles/the_costs_of_risky_male_behaviour_sex_differences_in_seasonal_survival_in_a_small_sexually_3071.htm
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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany in its series MPIDR Working Papers with number WP-2008-005.

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    Length: 23 pages
    Date of creation: Feb 2008
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:dem:wpaper:wp-2008-005

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    Web page: http://www.demogr.mpg.de/

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    Cited by:
    1. Junji Kageyama, 2009. "Happiness and sex difference in life expectancy," MPIDR Working Papers, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany WP-2009-009, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    2. Junji Kageyama, 2012. "Happiness and Sex Difference in Life Expectancy," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, Springer, vol. 13(5), pages 947-967, October.

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