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What To Do About The Social Security Earnings Test?

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  • Jonathan Gruber
  • Peter Orszag
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    Abstract

    The Social Security earnings test is one of the least popular features of Social Security. It also is one of the most widely misunderstood. This issue in brief discusses how the earnings test functions and examines options for reform.

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    File URL: http://crr.bc.edu/briefs/what-to-do-about-the-social-security-earnings-test/
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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by Center for Retirement Research in its series Issues in Brief with number ib-1.

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    Length: 15 pages
    Date of creation: Jul 1999
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:crr:issbrf:ib-1

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    Cited by:
    1. Hugo Ben�tez-Silva & Frank Heiland, 2007. "The social security earnings test and work incentives," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 26(3), pages 527-555.
    2. Hugo Benítez-Silva & Debra Sabatini Dwyer & Warren Sanderson, 2006. "A Dynamic Model of Retirement and Social Security Reform Expectations: A Solution to the New Early Retirement Puzzle," Working Papers, University of Michigan, Michigan Retirement Research Center wp134, University of Michigan, Michigan Retirement Research Center.
    3. Alan L. Gustman & Thomas L. Steinmeier, 2004. "The social Security Retirement Earnings Test, Retirement and Benefit Claiming," NBER Working Papers 10905, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Nizalova, Olena Y., 2010. "The Wage Elasticity of Informal Care Supply: Evidence from the Health and Retirement Study," IZA Discussion Papers 5192, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. Song, Jae G. & Manchester, Joyce, 2007. "New evidence on earnings and benefit claims following changes in the retirement earnings test in 2000," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 91(3-4), pages 669-700, April.
    6. Coile, Courtney & Diamond, Peter & Gruber, Jonathan & Jousten, Alain, 2002. "Delays in claiming social security benefits," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 84(3), pages 357-385, June.
    7. Elizabeth Powers & David Neumark, 2001. "The Supplemental Security Income Program and Incentives to Take Up Social Security Early Retirement: Empirical Evidence from Matched SIPP and Social.," NBER Working Papers 8670, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Peter Eso & Andras Siminovits, 2002. "Designing Optimal Benefit Rules for Flexible Retirement," Discussion Papers, Northwestern University, Center for Mathematical Studies in Economics and Management Science 1353, Northwestern University, Center for Mathematical Studies in Economics and Management Science.

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