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Manufacturing and the Convergence Hypothesis: What the Long Run Data Show

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  • Broadberry, Stephen N

Abstract

The commonly accepted chronology for comparative productivity levels based on GDP data does not apply to the manufacturing sector, where there is evidence of a much greater degree of stationarity of comparative labour productivity performance among the major industrialized countries of Germany, the United Kingdom and the United States. These results for manufacturing suggest that convergence of GDP per worker must have occurred through trends in other sectors and through compositional effects of structural change. The persistent large labour productivity gap between the US and Europe cannot be explained simply by differences in capital per worker, but is related to technological choice.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers in its series CEPR Discussion Papers with number 708.

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Date of creation: Jul 1992
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Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:708

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Keywords: Convergence; Labour Productivity; Long-run; Manufacturing;

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Cited by:
  1. J. E. Birnie & D. M. W. N. Hitchens, 1998. "Productivity and Income Per Capita Convergence in a Peripheral European Economy: The Irish Experience," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 32(3), pages 223-234.
  2. Albrecht Ritschl, 2008. "The Anglo-German industrial productivity puzzle, 1895-1935: a restatement and a possible resolution," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 41339, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  3. Barry Eichengreen & Albrecht Ritschl, 2008. "Understanding West German Economic Growth in the 1950s," SFB 649 Discussion Papers SFB649DP2008-068, Sonderforschungsbereich 649, Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany.
  4. Koski, Heli A. & Majumdar, Sumit K., 2000. "Convergence in telecommunications infrastructure development in OECD countries," Information Economics and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 12(2), pages 111-131, June.
  5. Walter Stanners, 1996. "De-Industrialisation," Development and Comp Systems 9601001, EconWPA, revised 05 Aug 1996.
  6. Louis D. Johnston & Menzie D. Chinn, 1996. "How well is the United States competing? A comment on Papadakis," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 15(1), pages 68-81.
  7. Banerjee, Rajabrata, 2011. "The US-UK productivity gap in the twentieth century: a race between technology and population," MPRA Paper 30889, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  8. Silvia Dal Bianco, 2010. "Going Clubbing in the Eighties: Convergence in Manufacturing Sectors at a Glance," Quaderni di Dipartimento 135, University of Pavia, Department of Economics and Quantitative Methods.
  9. Alejandro Diaz-Bautista, 2005. "Regional Convergence of Income and Labor Productivity in Mexico," Urban/Regional 0512016, EconWPA.
  10. Gianfranco Di Vaio & Kerstin Enflo, 2009. "Did Globalization Lead to Segmentation? Identifying Cross-Country Growth Regimes in the Long-Run," Discussion Papers 09-08, University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics.
  11. Albrecht Ritschl, 2008. "The Anglo-German productivity puzzle, 1895-1935: a restatement and a possible resolution," Economic History Working Papers 22309, London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Economic History.
  12. Broadberry, Stephen & Burhop, Carsten, 2008. "Resolving the Anglo-German Industrial Productivity Puzzle, 1895–1935: A Response to Professor Ritschl," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 68(03), pages 930-934, September.
  13. Broadberry, Stephen & Gupta, Bishnupriya, 2007. "The Historical Roots Of India’s Service-Led Development : A Sectoral Analysis Of Anglo-Indian Productivity Differences, 1870-2000," The Warwick Economics Research Paper Series (TWERPS) 817, University of Warwick, Department of Economics.

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