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Contention and Ambiguity: Mining and the Possibilities of Development

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  • Anthony Bebbington
  • Leonith Hinojosa
  • Denise Humphreys Bebbington
  • Maria Luisa Burneo
  • Ximena Warnaars
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    Abstract

    The last decade and a half has witnessed a dramatic growth in mining activity in many developing countries. This paper reviews these recent trends and describes the debates and conflicts they have triggered. We review evidence regarding debates on the resource curse and the possibility of an extraction-led pathway to development. We then describe the different types of resistance and social mobilisation that have greeted mineral expansion at a range of geographical scales, and consider how far these protests have changed the relationships between mining and political economic change. The conclusions address how far such protest might contribute to an ’escape‘ from the resource curse, and consider implications for research and policy agendas.

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    File URL: http://www.bwpi.manchester.ac.uk/medialibrary/publications/working_papers/bwpi-wp-5708.pdf
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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by BWPI, The University of Manchester in its series Brooks World Poverty Institute Working Paper Series with number 5708.

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    Date of creation: 2008
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    Handle: RePEc:bwp:bwppap:5708

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    Cited by:
    1. O’Faircheallaigh, Ciaran & Gibson, Ginger, 2012. "Economic risk and mineral taxation on Indigenous lands," Resources Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 10-18.
    2. Spiegel, Samuel J., 2012. "Governance Institutions, Resource Rights Regimes, and the Informal Mining Sector: Regulatory Complexities in Indonesia," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 40(1), pages 189-205.
    3. Southalan, John, 2011. "What are the implications of human rights for minerals taxation?," Resources Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(3), pages 214-226, September.
    4. Orihuela, José Carlos, 2013. "How do “Mineral-States” Learn? Path-Dependence, Networks, and Policy Change in the Development of Economic Institutions," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 138-148.
    5. Elisa Ticci, 2011. "Extractive Industries and Local Development in the Peruvian Highlands: Socio-Economic Impacts of the Mid-1990s Mining Boom," RSCAS Working Papers 2011/14, European University Institute.
    6. Slack, Keith, 2012. "Mission impossible?: Adopting a CSR-based business model for extractive industries in developing countries," Resources Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(2), pages 179-184.

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