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MICE for multiple imputation of missing values

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  • Patrick Royston

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    (MRC Clinical Trials Unit, London)

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    Abstract

    The publication of Royston (2004)'s Stata implementation of the MICE method for multiple imputation of missing values has stimulated much interest, comment and further development of the software. In this talk I will describe enhancements of what used to be called mvis.ado and is now known as mice.ado. The main changes are greatly increased flexibility in the specification of the prediction equations for individual variables, better handling of ordered and nominal categoric variables, and support for so-called passive imputation in which derived variables are updated from primary variables. All of these features reflect van Buuren's implementation of MICE on a different statistical platform. I will demonstrate their use by an example with real data. An article on the topic is in preparation (Royston 2005).

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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by Stata Users Group in its series United Kingdom Stata Users' Group Meetings 2005 with number 02.

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    Date of creation: 03 Mar 2005
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    Handle: RePEc:boc:usug05:02

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    Web page: http://www.stata.com/meeting/11uk
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    Cited by:
    1. Richard J. Petts, 2009. "Fathers’ Religious Involvement And Early Childhood Behavior," Working Papers 1208, Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Center for Research on Child Wellbeing..
    2. Douglas S. Noonan, 2007. "Finding an Impact of Preservation Policies: Price Effects of Historic Landmarks on Attached Homes in Chicago, 1990-1999," Economic Development Quarterly, , vol. 21(1), pages 17-33, February.
    3. Melissa A. Clark & Hanley S. Chiang & Tim Silva & Sheena McConnell & Kathy Sonnenfeld & Anastasia Erbe & Michael Puma, 2013. "The Effectiveness of Secondary Math Teachers from Teach For America and the Teaching Fellows Programs," Mathematica Policy Research Reports 7890, Mathematica Policy Research.
    4. Juho Härkönen & Hande Kaymakçalan & Pirjo Mäki & Anja Taanila, 2012. "Prenatal Health, Educational Attainment, and Intergenerational Inequality: The Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966 Study," Demography, Springer, vol. 49(2), pages 525-552, May.
    5. Reza C. Daniels, 2012. "Univariate Multiple Imputation for Coarse Employee Income Data," SALDRU Working Papers 88, Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit, University of Cape Town.
    6. Petrit Gashi & Iraj Hashi & Geoff Pugh, 2014. "Export behaviour of SMEs in transition countries," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 42(2), pages 407-435, February.
    7. Jaenichen, Ursula & Sakshaug, Joseph, 2012. "Multiple imputation of household income in the first wave of PASS," FDZ Methodenreport 201202_en, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany].
    8. Catherine Kenney, 2007. "His Dollar ? Her Dollar ? Their Dollar: The Effects of Couples' Money Management Systems on Union Dissolution and Women's Labor Force Participation," Working Papers 25, Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Center for Research on Child Wellbeing..

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