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A hot-potato game under transient price impact and some effects of a transaction tax

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  • Alexander Schied
  • Tao Zhang
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    Abstract

    Building on observations by Sch\"oneborn (2008), we consider a Nash equilibrium between two high-frequency traders in a simple market impact model with transient price impact and additional quadratic transaction costs. We show that for small transaction costs the high-frequency traders engage in a "hot-potato game", in which the same asset position is sold back and forth. We then identify a critical value for the size of the transaction costs above which all oscillations disappear and strategies become buy-only or sell-only. Numerical simulations show that for both traders the expected costs can be lower with transaction costs than without. Moreover, the costs can increase with the trading frequency when there are no transaction costs, but decrease with the trading frequency when transaction costs are sufficiently high. We argue that these effects occur due to the need of protection against predatory trading in the regime of low transaction costs.

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    File URL: http://arxiv.org/pdf/1305.4013
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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by arXiv.org in its series Papers with number 1305.4013.

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    Date of creation: May 2013
    Date of revision: Sep 2013
    Handle: RePEc:arx:papers:1305.4013

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    Web page: http://arxiv.org/

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    1. Markus K. Brunnermeier & Lasse Heje Pedersen, 2005. "Predatory Trading," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 60(4), pages 1825-1863, 08.
    2. Aurelien Alfonsi & Antje Fruth & Alexander Schied, 2010. "Optimal execution strategies in limit order books with general shape functions," Quantitative Finance, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 10(2), pages 143-157.
    3. Bertsimas, Dimitris & Lo, Andrew W., 1998. "Optimal control of execution costs," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 1(1), pages 1-50, April.
    4. Jim Gatheral, 2010. "No-dynamic-arbitrage and market impact," Quantitative Finance, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 10(7), pages 749-759.
    5. Obizhaeva, Anna A. & Wang, Jiang, 2013. "Optimal trading strategy and supply/demand dynamics," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 16(1), pages 1-32.
    6. Bruce Ian Carlin & Miguel Sousa Lobo & S. Viswanathan, 2007. "Episodic Liquidity Crises: Cooperative and Predatory Trading," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 62(5), pages 2235-2274, October.
    7. Aur\'elien Alfonsi & Antje Fruth & Alexander Schied, 2007. "Optimal execution strategies in limit order books with general shape functions," Papers 0708.1756, arXiv.org, revised Feb 2010.
    8. Aurélien Alfonsi & Alexander Schied, 2010. "Optimal trade execution and absence of price manipulations in limit order book models," Post-Print hal-00397652, HAL.
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