Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Changing Consumer Food Prices: A User's Guide to ERS Analyses

Contents:

Author Info

  • Reed, Albert J.
  • Hanson, Kenneth
  • Elitzak, Howard
  • Schluter, Gerald E.

Abstract

USDA's Economic Research Service (ERS) uses different economic models to estimate the impact of higher input prices on consumer food prices. The present study compares three ERS models. In the first two models, neither consumers nor food producers respond to market prices. We refer to these two models as short-run models. In the third model, both consumers and food producers respond to changing prices, and we refer to this model as a long-run model. Given published parameter estimates, we simulate the impact of a higher energy price on consumer food prices, and our empirical findings are consistent with our understanding of market responses. In the short run, we find that the full effect of an increase in the price of energy is fully (or nearly fully) passed on to consumers, because neither food producers nor consumers can immediately respond to changing prices. In the long run, however, the price response of food producers and consumers serves to mitigate the increase in consumer food prices.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/33574
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service in its series Technical Bulletins with number 33574.

as in new window
Length:
Date of creation: 1997
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:ags:uerstb:33574

Contact details of provider:
Postal: 1400 Independence Ave.,SW, Mail Stop 1800, Washington, DC 20250-1800
Phone: 202-694-5050
Fax: 202-694-5700
Email:
Web page: http://www.ers.usda.gov/
More information through EDIRC

Related research

Keywords: price-spread model; input-output model; variable-proportions model; food prices; energy prices; input prices; Demand and Price Analysis;

Other versions of this item:

References

No references listed on IDEAS
You can help add them by filling out this form.

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Gicheva, Dora & Hastings, Justine & Villas-Boas, Sofia B, 2008. "Revisiting the Income Effect: Gasoline Prices and Grocery Purchases," Department of Agricultural & Resource Economics, UC Berkeley, Working Paper Series qt7087m1p6, Department of Agricultural & Resource Economics, UC Berkeley.
  2. Cullen S. Hendrix, 2011. "Markets vs. Malthus: Food Security and the Global Economy," Policy Briefs PB11-12, Peterson Institute for International Economics.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ags:uerstb:33574. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (AgEcon Search).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.