Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this book chapter or follow this series

Introduction to Services and Employment: Explaining the U.S.-European Gap
[Services and Employment: Explaining the U.S.-European Gap]

Contents:

Author Info

  • Mary Gregory

    (St Hilda's College, University of Oxford)

  • Wiemer Salverda

    (Amsterdam Institute for Advanced Labor Studies at the University of Amsterdam)

  • Ronald Schettkat

    (University of Wuppertal, Germany)

Abstract

Why is Europe's employment rate almost 10 percent lower than that of the United States? This "jobs gap" has typically been blamed on the rigidity of European labor markets. But in Services and Employment , an international group of leading labor economists suggests quite a different explanation. Drawing on the findings of a two-year research project that examined data from France, Germany, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom, and the United States, these economists argue that Europe's 25 million "missing" jobs can be attributed almost entirely to its relative lack of service jobs. The jobs gap is actually a services gap. But, Services and Employment asks, why does the United States consume services at such a greater rate than Europe? Services and Employment is the first systematic and comprehensive international comparison on the subject. Mary Gregory, Wiemer Salverda, Ronald Schettkat, and their fellow contributors consider the possible role played by differences in how certain services--particularly health care and education--are provided in Europe and the United States. They examine arguments that Americans consume more services because of their higher incomes and that American households outsource more domestic work. The contributors also ask whether differences between U.S. and European service sectors encapsulate fundamental trans-Atlantic differences in lifestyle choices. In addition to the editors, the contributors include Victor Fuchs, William Baumol, Giovanni Russo, Adriaan Kalwij, Stephen Machin, Andrew Glyn, Joachin Möller, John Schmitt, Michel Sollogoub, Robert Gordon, and Richard Freeman.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://press.princeton.edu/chapters/i8441.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

as in new window

This chapter was published in: Mary Gregory & Wiemer Salverda & Ronald Schettkat (ed.) , , pages , 2007.

This item is provided by Princeton University Press in its series Introductory Chapters with number 8441-1.

Handle: RePEc:pup:chapts:8441-1

Contact details of provider:
Web page: http://press.princeton.edu

Related research

Keywords: services; employment; jobs gap; rigidity; labor market; health care; education; incomes; lifestyle; United States; Europe;

Find related papers by JEL classification:

References

No references listed on IDEAS
You can help add them by filling out this form.

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Jan Fagerberg & Maryann Feldman & Martin Srholec, 2012. "Technological Dynamics and Social Capability: Comparing U.S. States and European Nations," CERGE-EI Working Papers wp455, The Center for Economic Research and Graduate Education - Economic Institute, Prague.
  2. Wiemer Salverda & Christina Haas & Marloes Graaf-zijl & Bram Lancee & Natascha Notten & Tahnee Ooms, 2013. "GINI Country Report: Growing Inequalities and their Impacts in the Netherlands," GINI Country Reports netherlands, AIAS, Amsterdam Institute for Advanced Labour Studies.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:pup:chapts:8441-1. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Webmaster).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.