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Complexity in Social Worlds, from Complex Adaptive Systems: An Introduction to Computational Models of Social Life
[Complex Adaptive Systems: An Introduction to Computational Models of Social Life]

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Author Info

  • John H. Miller

    (Carnegie Mellon University)

  • Scott E. Page

    (University of Michigan)

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    Abstract

    This book provides the first clear, comprehensive, and accessible account of complex adaptive social systems, by two of the field's leading authorities. Such systems--whether political parties, stock markets, or ant colonies--present some of the most intriguing theoretical and practical challenges confronting the social sciences. Engagingly written, and balancing technical detail with intuitive explanations, Complex Adaptive Systems focuses on the key tools and ideas that have emerged in the field since the mid-1990s, as well as the techniques needed to investigate such systems. It provides a detailed introduction to concepts such as emergence, self-organized criticality, automata, networks, diversity, adaptation, and feedback. It also demonstrates how complex adaptive systems can be explored using methods ranging from mathematics to computational models of adaptive agents. John Miller and Scott Page show how to combine ideas from economics, political science, biology, physics, and computer science to illuminate topics in organization, adaptation, decentralization, and robustness. They also demonstrate how the usual extremes used in modeling can be fruitfully transcended.

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    Bibliographic Info

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    This chapter was published in: John H. Miller & Scott E. Page , , pages , 2007.

    This item is provided by Princeton University Press in its series Introductory Chapters with number 8429-2.

    Handle: RePEc:pup:chapts:8429-2

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    Web page: http://press.princeton.edu

    Related research

    Keywords: emergence; self-organized criticality; automata; networks; diversity; adaptation; feedback; organization; robustness;

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    Citations

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    Cited by:
    1. S. Gualdi & M. Medo & Y.-C. Zhang, 2011. "Self-organized model of cascade spreading," The European Physical Journal B - Condensed Matter and Complex Systems, Springer, vol. 79(1), pages 91-98, January.
    2. Griffiths, Frances & Cave, Jonathan & Boardman, Felicity & Ren, Justin & Pawlikowska, Teresa & Ball, Robin & Clarke, Aileen & Cohen, Alan, 2012. "Social networks – The future for health care delivery," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 75(12), pages 2233-2241.
    3. Verónica Amarante & Ivone Perazzo, 2011. "Cantidad de niños en los hogares uruguayos: un análisis de los determinantes económicos, 1996-2006," Estudios Económicos, El Colegio de México, Centro de Estudios Económicos, vol. 26(1), pages 3-34.
    4. Margaret Hargreaves & Diane Paulsell, 2009. "Evaluating Systems Change Efforts to Support Evidence-Based Home Visiting: Concepts and Methods," Mathematica Policy Research Reports 6373, Mathematica Policy Research.
    5. G. Cimini & M. Medo & T. Zhou & D. Wei & Y.-C. Zhang, 2011. "Heterogeneity, quality, and reputation in an adaptive recommendation model," The European Physical Journal B - Condensed Matter and Complex Systems, Springer, vol. 80(2), pages 201-208, March.
    6. Russell Golman & Scott Page, 2009. "General Blotto: games of allocative strategic mismatch," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 138(3), pages 279-299, March.
    7. McDonnell, Simon & Zellner, Moira, 2011. "Exploring the effectiveness of bus rapid transit a prototype agent-based model of commuting behavior," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 18(6), pages 825-835, November.
    8. Harper, David A. & Endres, Anthony M., 2012. "The anatomy of emergence, with a focus upon capital formation," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 82(2), pages 352-367.
    9. Gonzalo Castañeda, 2010. "Crisis económicas y cambios de paradigma," Estudios Económicos, El Colegio de México, Centro de Estudios Económicos, vol. 25(2), pages 425-441.
    10. Levent Yilmaz, 2011. "Toward Multi-Level, Multi-Theoretical Model Portfolios for Scientific Enterprise Workforce Dynamics," Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, vol. 14(4), pages 2.
    11. Amini, Mehdi & Wakolbinger, Tina & Racer, Michael & Nejad, Mohammad G., 2012. "Alternative supply chain production–sales policies for new product diffusion: An agent-based modeling and simulation approach," European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier, vol. 216(2), pages 301-311.
    12. Bednar, Jenna & Chen, Yan & Liu, Tracy Xiao & Page, Scott, 2012. "Behavioral spillovers and cognitive load in multiple games: An experimental study," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 74(1), pages 12-31.

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