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Introduction to The Strictures of Inheritance: The Dutch Economy in the Nineteenth Century
[The Strictures of Inheritance: The Dutch Economy in the Nineteenth Century]

Contents:

Author Info

  • Jan Luiten van Zanden

    (Utrecht University, International Institute of Social History.)

  • Arthur van Riel

    (Dutch Ministry of the Interior; Netherlands’s Economic Institute, Rotterdam)

Abstract

A major feat of research and synthesis, this book presents the first comprehensive history of the Dutch economy in the nineteenth century--an important but poorly understood piece of European economic history. Based on a detailed reconstruction of extensive economic data, the authors account for demise of the Dutch economy’s golden age. After showing how institutional factors combined to make the Dutch economy a victim of its own success, the book traces its subsequent emergence as a modern industrial economy. Between 1780 and 1914, the Netherlands went through a double transition. Its economy--which, in the words of Adam Smith, was approaching a "stationary state" in the eighteenth century--entered a process of modern economic growth during the middle decades of the nineteenth. At the same time, the country’s sociopolitical structure was undergoing radical transformation as the decentralized polity of the republic gave way to a unitary state. As the authors show, the dramatic transformation of the Dutch political structure was intertwined with equally radical changes in the institutional structure of the economy. The outcome of this dual transition was a rapidly industrializing economy on one side and, on the other, the neocorporatist sociopolitical structure that would characterize the Netherlands in the twentieth century. Analyzing both processes with a focus on institutional change, this book argues that the economic and political development of the Netherlands can be understood only in tandem.

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Bibliographic Info

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This chapter was published in: Jan Luiten van Zanden & Arthur van Riel , , pages , 2004.

This item is provided by Princeton University Press in its series Introductory Chapters with number 7732-1.

Handle: RePEc:pup:chapts:7732-1

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Web page: http://press.princeton.edu

Related research

Keywords: economic history; growth; industrialization; sociopolitical structure; neocorporatism; institutional change; political development;

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Cited by:
  1. van den Heuvel, Danielle & Ogilvie, Sheilagh, 2013. "Retail development in the consumer revolution: The Netherlands, c. 1670–c. 1815," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 50(1), pages 69-87.
  2. Koen Frenken, 2013. "The evolution of the Dutch dairy industry and the rise of cooperatives.A research note," Working Papers 13-07, Eindhoven Center for Innovation Studies, revised Aug 2013.
  3. Florian Ploeckl, 2010. "The Zollverein and the Formation of a Customs Union," Economics Series Working Papers Number 84, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
  4. Lindeboom, Maarten & Portrait, France & van den Berg, Gerard J., 2010. "Long-run effects on longevity of a nutritional shock early in life: The Dutch Potato famine of 1846-1847," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(5), pages 617-629, September.
  5. Frans W.A. van Poppel & Hendrik P. van Dalen & Evelien Walhout, 2006. "Diffusion of a Social Norm: Tracing the Emergence of the Housewife in the Netherlands, 1812-1922," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 06-107/1, Tinbergen Institute.
  6. van Zanden, Jan Luiten & van Leeuwen, Bas, 2012. "Persistent but not consistent: The growth of national income in Holland 1347–1807," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 49(2), pages 119-130.
  7. Schenk, Niels & van Poppel, Frans, 2011. "Social class, social mobility and mortality in the Netherlands, 1850-2004," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 48(3), pages 401-417, July.
  8. Tracy Dennison & Sheilagh Ogilvie, 2013. "Does the European Marriage Pattern Explain Economic Growth," CESifo Working Paper Series 4244, CESifo Group Munich.
  9. Oscar Gelderblom & Joost Jonker, 2013. "Early Capitalism in the Low Countries," Working Papers 0041, Utrecht University, Centre for Global Economic History.

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