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Military expenditure and developing countries

In: Handbook of Defense Economics

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  • Deger, Saadet
  • Sen, Somnath
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    Abstract

    Military expenditure in developing countries raises complex questions regarding growth, development, security and governance. This chapter provides an analytical survey of the effects and causes of defense spending in developing economies. Using stylized facts, theoretical models and empirical results, it discusses some core aspects of the interrelationship between defense and development. The chapter emphasizes two major issues in the field: economic growth and defense spending; security and development. Although the issues are placed in a broad framework, the focus of the chapter is on economic aspects of the interaction of military expenditures with growth and developmental factors.

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    This chapter was published in:

  • Keith Hartley & Todd Sandler (ed.), 1995. "Handbook of Defense Economics," Handbook of Defense Economics, Elsevier, edition 1, volume 1, number 1, 00.
    This item is provided by Elsevier in its series Handbook of Defense Economics with number 1-11.

    Handle: RePEc:eee:hdechp:1-11

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    Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/bookseriesdescription.cws_home/BS_HE/description

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    Cited by:
    1. Chen, Pei-Fen & Lee, Chien-Chiang & Chiu, Yi-Bin, 2014. "The nexus between defense expenditure and economic growth: New global evidence," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 474-483.
    2. Gong, Liutang & Zou, Heng-fu, 2003. "Military spending and stochastic growth," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 28(1), pages 153-170, October.
    3. Luca Pieroni, 2007. "Military Spending and Economic Growth," Working Papers 0708, Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol.
    4. Alexamder, W.R. & Hansen, P. Author-Emai, 2004. "A Criritique of the Multi-Sector Model of the Effects of Military Spending on Economic Growth," Applied Econometrics and International Development, Euro-American Association of Economic Development, vol. 4(2).
    5. Keller, Katarina & Poutvaara, Panu & Wagener, Andreas, 2006. "Military Draft and Economic Growth in OECD Countries," IZA Discussion Papers 2022, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    6. J Paul Dunne & Ron Smith & Dirk Willenbockel, 2004. "Models of Military Expenditure and Growth: A Critical Review," Working Papers 0408, Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol.
    7. Alptekin, Aynur & Levine, Paul, 2012. "Military expenditure and economic growth: A meta-analysis," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 28(4), pages 636-650.
    8. Cheng-Te Lee, 2007. "A New Explanation of Arms Races in the Third World: A Differential Game Model," Journal of Economics and Management, College of Business, Feng Chia University, Taiwan, vol. 3(2), pages 161-176, July.
    9. Richard Barrett & Somnath Sen, 2009. "Rational Defence: War and Peace in South Asia," Discussion Papers 09-11, Department of Economics, University of Birmingham.
    10. Paresh Kumar Narayan & Russell Smyth, 2007. "The Military Expenditure-External Debt Nexus: New Evidence From A Panel Of Middle Eastern Countries," Monash Economics Working Papers 17-07, Monash University, Department of Economics.
    11. Chang, Wen-ya & Tsai, Hsueh-fang & Lai, Ching-chong, 2002. "Anticipated foreign military threat, arms accumulation, and the current account in a small open economy," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 21(7), pages 1035-1052, December.
    12. Yousif Khalifa Al-Yousif, 2002. "Defense Spending and Economic Growth: Some Empirical Evidence from the Arab Gulf Region," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(3), pages 187-197.
    13. Jesús Crespo Guaresma & Gerhard Reitschuler, 2003. ""Guns or Butter?" Revisited: Robustness and Nonlinearity Issues in the Defense-Grotwth Nexus," Vienna Economics Papers 0310, University of Vienna, Department of Economics.
    14. Gerhard Reitschuler & Ludger J. Löning, 2004. "Modeling the Defense-Growth Nexus in a Post-Conflict Country - A Piecewise Linear Approach," Ibero America Institute for Econ. Research (IAI) Discussion Papers 097, Ibero-America Institute for Economic Research.

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