Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this book or follow this series

Famous First Bubbles: The Fundamentals of Early Manias

Contents:

Author Info

  • Peter M. Garber

    ()
    (Brown University)

Abstract

The jargon of economics and finance contains numerous colorful terms for market-asset prices at odds with any reasonable economic explanation. Examples include "bubble," "tulipmania," "chain letter," "Ponzi scheme," "panic," "crash," "herding," and "irrational exuberance." Although such a term suggests that an event is inexplicably crowd-driven, what it really means, claims Peter Garber, is that we have grasped a near-empty explanation rather than expend the effort to understand the event. In this book Garber offers market-fundamental explanations for the three most famous bubbles: the Dutch Tulipmania (1634-1637), the Mississippi Bubble (1719-1720), and the closely connected South Sea Bubble (1720). He focuses most closely on the Tulipmania because it is the event that most modern observers view as clearly crazy. Comparing the pattern of price declines for initially rare eighteenth-century bulbs to that of seventeenth-century bulbs, he concludes that the extremely high prices for rare bulbs and their rapid decline reflects normal pricing behavior. In the cases of the Mississippi and South Sea Bubbles, he describes the asset markets and financial manipulations involved in these episodes and casts them as market fundamentals.

Download Info

To our knowledge, this item is not available for download. To find whether it is available, there are three options:
1. Check below under "Related research" whether another version of this item is available online.
2. Check on the provider's web page whether it is in fact available.
3. Perform a search for a similarly titled item that would be available.

Bibliographic Info

as in new window
This book is provided by The MIT Press in its series MIT Press Books with number 0262571536 and published in 2001.

Volume: 1
Edition: 1
ISBN: 0-262-57153-6
Handle: RePEc:mtp:titles:0262571536

Contact details of provider:
Web page: http://mitpress.mit.edu

Related research

Keywords: bubbles; Dutch Tulipmania; market-asset prices;

Find related papers by JEL classification:

References

No references listed on IDEAS
You can help add them by filling out this form.

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. M. Fase, 2007. "Book Review," De Economist, Springer, vol. 155(3), pages 339-341, September.
  2. Campbell, Gareth & Turner, John, 2010. "‘The Greatest Bubble in History’: Stock Prices during the British Railway Mania," MPRA Paper 21820, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  3. Lubos Pastor & Pietro Veronesi, 2004. "Was There a Nasdaq Bubble in the Late 1990s?," NBER Working Papers 10581, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Campbell, Gareth, 2012. "Myopic rationality in a Mania," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 49(1), pages 75-91.
  5. Thomas Schuster, 2003. "Meta-Communication and Market Dynamics. Reflexive Interactions of Financial Markets and the Mass Media," Finance 0307014, EconWPA.
  6. Kumar, Praveen & Langberg, Nisan, 2013. "Information manipulation and rational investment booms and busts," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 60(4), pages 408-425.
  7. Giovanni Giusti & Charles Noussair & Hans-Joachim Voth, 2013. "Recreating the South Sea Bubble: Lessons from an Experiment in Financial History," Working Papers 710, Barcelona Graduate School of Economics.
  8. Malcolm Anderson, 2002. "Accounting History publications 2001," Accounting History Review, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 12(3), pages 505-512.
  9. Bradly Alicea, 2014. "Contextual and Structural Representations of Market-mediated Economic Value," Papers 1403.7021, arXiv.org.
  10. Christopher Kobrak & Mira Wilkins, 2011. "The '2008 Crisis' in an economic history perspective: Looking at the twentieth century," Business History, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 53(2), pages 175-192.
  11. Powell, O.R., 2010. "Essays on experimental bubble markets," Open Access publications from Tilburg University urn:nbn:nl:ui:12-4219264, Tilburg University.
  12. John Quiggin, 2011. "What Have We Learned from the Global Financial Crisis?," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 44(4), pages 355-365, December.
  13. Turner, John D., 2014. "Financial history and financial economics," QUCEH Working Paper Series 14-03, Queen's University Centre for Economic History, Queen's University Belfast.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:mtp:titles:0262571536. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Jake Furbush).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.