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Banking Panics of the Gilded Age

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  • Wicker,Elmus
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    Abstract

    This was the first major study of post-Civil War banking panics in almost a century. The author has constructed estimates of bank closures and their incidence in each of the five separate banking disturbances. The book takes a novel approach by reconstructing the course of banking panics in the interior, where suspension of cash payment, not bank closures, was the primary effect of banking panics on the average person. The author also re-evaluates the role of the New York Clearing House in forestalling several panics and explains why it failed to do so in 1893 and 1907, concluding that structural defects of the National Banking Act were not the primary cause of the panics.

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    Bibliographic Info

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    This book is provided by Cambridge University Press in its series Cambridge Books with number 9780521770231 and published in 2000.

    Order: http://www.cambridge.org/uk/catalogue/catalogue.asp?isbn=9780521770231
    Handle: RePEc:cup:cbooks:9780521770231

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    Web page: http://www.cambridge.org

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    Cited by:
    1. Amil Dasgupta, 2002. "Financial contagion through capital connections: a model of the origin and spread of bank panics," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 24956, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    2. Michele Fratianni, 2008. "Financial Crises, Safety Nets and Regulation," Mo.Fi.R. Working Papers 5, Money and Finance Research group (Mo.Fi.R.) - Univ. Politecnica Marche - Dept. Economic and Social Sciences.
    3. Tallman, Ellis W. & Moen, Jon R., 2012. "Liquidity creation without a central bank: Clearing house loan certificates in the banking panic of 1907," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 8(4), pages 277-291.
    4. François Marini, 2006. "Optimal financial crises: A note on Allen and Gale," The Geneva Papers on Risk and Insurance Theory, Springer, vol. 31(1), pages 61-66, July.
    5. Jeffrey M. Lacker, 2003. "Payment system disruptions and the Federal Reserve following September 11, 2001," Working Paper 03-16, Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond.
    6. Mark Carlson, 2002. "Causes of bank suspensions in the panic of 1893," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2002-11, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    7. Carola Frydman & Eric Hilt & Lily Y. Zhou, 2012. "Economic Effects of Runs on Early 'Shadow Banks': Trust Companies and the Impact of the Panic of 1907," NBER Working Papers 18264, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Kay Giesecke & Francis A. Longstaff & Stephen Schaefer & Ilya Strebulaev, 2012. "Macroeconomic Effects of Corporate Default Crises: A Long-Term Perspective," NBER Working Papers 17854, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Michele FRATIANNI, 2008. "Financial Crises, Safety Nets and Regulation," Rivista Italiana degli Economisti, SIE - Societa' Italiana degli Economisti (I), vol. 13(2), pages 169-208, August.
    10. Kupiec, Paul H. & Ramirez, Carlos D., 2013. "Bank failures and the cost of systemic risk: Evidence from 1900 to 1930," Journal of Financial Intermediation, Elsevier, vol. 22(3), pages 285-307.
    11. Mark A. Carlson, 2013. "Lessons from the historical use of reserve requirements in the United States to promote bank liquidity," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2013-11, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    12. Gorton, Gary & Huang, Lixin, 2006. "Bank panics and the endogeneity of central banking," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 53(7), pages 1613-1629, October.
    13. Ramírez, Carlos D., 2009. "Bank fragility, "money under the mattress", and long-run growth: US evidence from the "perfect" Panic of 1893," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 33(12), pages 2185-2198, December.
    14. Hanes, Christopher & Rhode, Paul W., 2013. "Harvests and Financial Crises in Gold Standard America," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 73(01), pages 201-246, March.
    15. Selgin, George & Lastrapes, William D. & White, Lawrence H., 2012. "Has the Fed been a failure?," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 34(3), pages 569-596.
    16. de Boyer des Roches, Jérôme & Gomez Betancourt, Rebeca, 2010. "How did the US Monetary System work under the National Banking System (1863-1913) ?," Economics Papers from University Paris Dauphine 123456789/6554, Paris Dauphine University.
    17. Ellis W. Tallman, 2012. "The Panic of 1907," Working Paper 1228, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.
    18. Jon R. Moen & Ellis W. Tallman, 2013. "Close but not a central bank: The New York Clearing House and issues of clearing house loan certificates," Working Paper 1308, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.

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