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The Birth of the Euro

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  • Issing,Otmar
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    Abstract

    Today, 318 million people in 15 countries use the Euro, which now rivals the importance of the US Dollar in the world economy. This is an outcome that few would have predicted with confidence when the Euro was launched. How can we explain this success and what are the prospects for the future? There is nobody better placed to answer these questions than Otmar Issing, who as a founding member of the Executive Board of the European Central Bank (1998–2006), was one of the Euro's principal architects. His story is a unique insider account, combining personal memoir with reference to the academic and policy literature. Free of jargon, this is a very human reflection on a unique historical experiment and a key reference for all academics, policy makers, and 'Eurowatchers' seeking to understand how the Euro has got to where it is today and what challenges lie ahead.

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    Bibliographic Info

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    This book is provided by Cambridge University Press in its series Cambridge Books with number 9780521731867 and published in 2008.

    Order: http://www.cambridge.org/uk/catalogue/catalogue.asp?isbn=9780521731867
    Handle: RePEc:cup:cbooks:9780521731867

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    Web page: http://www.cambridge.org

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    Cited by:
    1. Otmar Issing, 2011. "Lessons for monetary policy: what should the consensus be?," Globalization and Monetary Policy Institute Working Paper 81, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas.
    2. Mojmír Hampl, 2012. "European Monetary Integration and a Position of its Former Hegemon," Politická ekonomie, University of Economics, Prague, University of Economics, Prague, vol. 2012(6), pages 707-722.
    3. Issing, Otmar & Wieland, Volker, 2012. "Monetary theory and monetary policy: Reflections on the development over the last 150 years," CFS Working Paper Series 2012/20, Center for Financial Studies (CFS).
    4. Bluhm, Marcel, 2011. "Investigating the monetary policy of central banks with assessment indicators," CFS Working Paper Series 2011/20, Center for Financial Studies (CFS).
    5. Otmar, Issing, 2011. "The crisis of European Monetary Union – Lessons to be drawn," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 33(5), pages 737-749, September.
    6. Stephen G. Hall & P.A.V.B. Swamy & George S. Tavlas, 2012. "Milton Friedman, the demand for money, and the ECB’s monetary policy strategy," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue May, pages 153-186.
    7. Anders Aslund, 2012. "Why a Breakup of the Euro Area Must Be Avoided: Lessons from Previous Breakups," Policy Briefs PB12-20, Peterson Institute for International Economics.
    8. Frances Goldscheider & Livia Sz. Oláh & Allan Puur, 2010. "Reconciling studies of men’s gender attitudes and fertility," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 22(8), pages 189-198, February.
    9. Otmar Issing, 2012. "Central Banks - Paradise Lost," IMES Discussion Paper Series 12-E-10, Institute for Monetary and Economic Studies, Bank of Japan.
    10. Alistair K. L. Milne, 2011. "Limited Liability Government Debt for the Eurozone -super-†," CESifo Economic Studies, CESifo, CESifo, vol. 57(1), pages 44-78, March.
    11. Otmar Issing, 2012. "The Mayekawa Lecture: Central Banks-Paradise Lost," Monetary and Economic Studies, Institute for Monetary and Economic Studies, Bank of Japan, Institute for Monetary and Economic Studies, Bank of Japan, vol. 30, pages 55-74, November.
    12. Mojmír Hampl, 2013. "The Case of European Monetary Integration and its Former Hegemon," German Economic Review, Verein für Socialpolitik, Verein für Socialpolitik, vol. 14(1), pages 2-14, 02.
    13. Issing, Otmar, 2011. "Lessons for monetary policy: What should the consensus be?," CFS Working Paper Series 2011/13, Center for Financial Studies (CFS).
    14. Issing, Otmar, 2012. "Central banks: Paradise lost," CFS Working Paper Series 2012/06, Center for Financial Studies (CFS).

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