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The First Modern Economy

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  • de Vries,Jan
  • van der Woude,Ad
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    Abstract

    The First Modern Economy, first published in 1997, provides a comprehensive economic history of the Netherlands during its rise to European economic leadership, the 'Golden Age', and subsequent decline (1500–1815). The authors argue that it was the first modern economy, and defend their position with detailed analyses of its major economic sectors, as well as investigations of social structure and macro-economic performance. Dutch economic history is placed in its European and world context, and inter-continental and colonial trade are discussed fully. Special emphasis is placed on the environmental context of economic growth and later decline, as well as on demographic developments. The authors also argue that the Dutch model of development and stagnation is applicable to currently maturing economies.

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    Bibliographic Info

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    This book is provided by Cambridge University Press in its series Cambridge Books with number 9780521578257 and published in 1997.

    Order: http://www.cambridge.org/uk/catalogue/catalogue.asp?isbn=9780521578257
    Handle: RePEc:cup:cbooks:9780521578257

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    Web page: http://www.cambridge.org

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    Cited by:
    1. Stephen Quinn & William Roberds, 2010. "How Amsterdam got fiat money," Working Paper 2010-17, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
    2. Jelle van Lottum & Jan Luiten van Zanden, 2011. "Labour Productivity and human capital in the maritime sector of the North Atlantic, c. 1672-1815," Working Papers 0022, Utrecht University, Centre for Global Economic History.
    3. Angeles, Luis, 2008. "GDP per capita or real wages? Making sense of conflicting views on pre-industrial Europe," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 45(2), pages 147-163, April.
    4. van Zanden, Jan Luiten & van Leeuwen, Bas, 2012. "Persistent but not consistent: The growth of national income in Holland 1347–1807," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 49(2), pages 119-130.
    5. Stephen Quinn & William Roberds, 2012. "Responding to a shadow banking crisis: the lessons of 1763," Working Paper 2012-08, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
    6. de Beer, Hans, 2004. "Observations on the history of Dutch physical stature from the late-Middle Ages to the present," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 2(1), pages 45-55, March.
    7. Jacks, David S., 2007. "Populists versus theorists: Futures markets and the volatility of prices," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 44(2), pages 342-362, April.
    8. Madarász, Aladár, 2009. "Buborékok és legendák. Válságok és válságmagyarázatok - a tulipánmánia és a Déltengeri Társaság, I. rész
      [Bubbles and myths, crises and explanations: tulip mania and the South Sea b
      ," Közgazdasági Szemle (Economic Review - monthly of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences), Közgazdasági Szemle Alapítvány (Economic Review Foundation), vol. 0(7), pages 609-633.
    9. van Zanden, Jan Luiten & van Tielhof, Milja, 2009. "Roots of growth and productivity change in Dutch shipping industry, 1500-1800," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 46(4), pages 389-403, October.
    10. Kyriazis, Nicholas & Metaxas, Theodore, 2012. "War for Profit: Macroculture, Corsairs and partnership companies," MPRA Paper 40926, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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