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Consumption and Social Welfare

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  • Slesnick,Daniel T.
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    Abstract

    The most widely cited social welfare statistics in the United States are based on tabulations of family income. The picture that emerges gives cause for concern: median family income has hardly changed over the last twenty-five years while inequality has increased and poverty remains persistently high. Yet consumption-based statistics as employed in this work yield rigorous and quite different estimates of real individual and social welfare. Closely linked to economic theory, Professor Slesnick's examination of standards of living, inequality, and poverty reveal that the standard of US living has grown significantly while inequality and poverty have decreased to relatively low levels. His assessment is drawn from extended period data in order to chart long-run trends. The work will be of interest to economists, sociologists, economic historians, political scientists, and other readers in the social and policy sciences. Designed to be accessible to non-economists, technical details are relegated to appendices.

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    Bibliographic Info

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    This book is provided by Cambridge University Press in its series Cambridge Books with number 9780521497206 and published in 2001.

    Order: http://www.cambridge.org/uk/catalogue/catalogue.asp?isbn=9780521497206
    Handle: RePEc:cup:cbooks:9780521497206

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    Web page: http://www.cambridge.org

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    Cited by:
    1. Fisher, Monica G. & Reimer, Jeffrey J. & Carr, Edward R., . "Who Should be Interviewed in Surveys of Household Income?," 2010 AAAE Third Conference/AEASA 48th Conference, September 19-23, 2010, Cape Town, South Africa 95950, African Association of Agricultural Economists (AAAE);Agricultural Economics Association of South Africa (AEASA).
    2. Jorgenson, Dale W. & Jin, Hui & Slesnick, Daniel T. & Wilcoxen, Peter J., 2013. "An Econometric Approach to General Equilibrium Modeling," Handbook of Computable General Equilibrium Modeling, Elsevier.
    3. Olga Cantó & Carlos Gradín & Coral Del Río, 2012. "Pobreza Crónica, Transitoria Y Recurrente En España," Revista de Economia Aplicada, Universidad de Zaragoza, Departamento de Estructura Economica y Economia Publica, vol. 20(1), pages 69-94, Spring.
    4. Alvarez-Cuadrado, Francisco & El-Attar, Mayssun, 2012. "Income Inequality and Saving," IZA Discussion Papers 7083, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. Jorgenson, Dale W. & Slesnick, Daniel T., 2008. "Consumption and labor supply," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 147(2), pages 326-335, December.
    6. Shahateet, Mohammed, 2006. "How Serious is Regional Economic Inequality in Jordan? Evidence from Two National Household Surveys," MPRA Paper 57118, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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